Notable Women in the Physical Sciences: A Biographical Dictionary

By Benjamin F. Shearer; Barbara S. Shearer | Go to book overview
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Charlotte Moore Sitterly and her husband enjoyed gardening, music, and traveling together until his death in 1977. Although Dr. Bancroft Sitterly's career was somewhat overshadowed by that of his illustrious wife, he also had been an accomplished physicist and educator. For many years he had held the position of chair of the physics department at American University in Washington, D.C. Throughout her life, Charlotte maintained close ties to her family and to the Society of Friends. In 1982 she researched and published a genealogy of her mother's family.

Charlotte Moore Sitterly had a long and illustrious career as an astronomer and astrophysicist. When spectroscopic data began to become available from instruments carried above the earth's atmosphere, she was immediately sent prints and began work on ranges of the spectra that had previously not been analyzed. She continued to work well past her mandatory retirement at the age of 70 until her death on March 3, 1990. She died in her home in Washington, D.C., of heart failure at the age of 91.


Notes
1.
See Current Biography Yearbook, 1962, ed. Charles Moritz ( New York: H.W. Wilson, 1962).
2.
Charlotte E. Moore, "Collaboration with Henry Norris Russell over the Years," in In Memory of Henry Norris Russell, eds. A. G. Davis Philip and David H. DeVorkin ( Albany, N.Y.: Dudley Observatory, 1977), pp. 27-28.
3.
R. Tousey, "The Solar Spectrum from Fraunhofer to Skylab--An Appreciation of the Contributions of Charlotte E. Moore Sitterly," Journal of the Optical Society of America, Part B 5, no. 10 ( October 1988): 2231.
4.
Karl G. Kessler, "Dr. Charlotte Moore Sitterly and the National Bureau of Standards," Journal of the Optical Society of America, Part B 5, no. 10 ( October 1988): 2045.

Bibliography

American Men and Women of Science. 13th ed. New York: R.R. Bowker, 1976.

Current Biography Yearbook, 1962. Edited by Charles Moritz. New York: H.W. Wilson, 1962.

Edlen B., and William C. Martin. "Atomic Spectroscopy in the Twentieth Century: A Tribute to Charlotte Moore Sitterly on the Occasion of her Ninetieth Birthday." Journal of the Optical Society of America, Part B 5, no. 10 ( October 1988): 2043-2044.

Kessler Karl G. "Dr. Charlotte Moore Sitterly and the National Bureau of Standards." Journal of the Optical Society of America, Part B 5, no. 10 ( October 1988): 2045.

Moore Charlotte E. Atomic Energy Levels as Derived from the Analyses of Optical Spectra. Washington, D.C.: National Bureau of Standards, 1945- 1958.

-----. "Collaboration with Henry Norris Russell over the Years," in In Memory

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