School Choice in the Real World: Lessons from Arizona Charter Schools

By Robert Maranto; Scott Milliman et al. | Go to book overview
3.
Our measurement at the individual teacher level greatly increases the degrees of statistical freedom; for example, usually at least 300 teachers provided data for a given dimension for all three groups. Measuring these changes at the district level is more difficult statistically due to inadequate statistical power; in particular, we have data from only fifteen Nevada districts.
4.
Given the high N in our sample and thus the great amount of statistical power, the statistical significance of many of our tests is not surprising. However, the effects are in a clear and predicted pattern, something that would not occur were the findings random. We also chose the Bonferroni post hoc test because it used a more stringent criterion of experiment-wise error.

References

Armour David L., and Brett M. Peiser. 1998. "Interdistrict Choice in Massachusetts." In Learning from School Choice, ed. Paul E. Peterson and Bryan C. Hassel. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution.

Barone Michael, Grant Ujifusa, and Richard E. Cohen. 1998. The Almanac of American Politics, 1998: The Senators, the Representatives, and the Governors: Their States and Districts. Washington, D.C.: National Journal.

Boyer Ernest L. 1992. School Choice. Princeton: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Bryk Anthony S., Valerie E. Lee, and Peter B. Holland. 1993. Catholic Schools and the Common Good. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Chubb John E., and Terry M. Moe. 1990. Politics, Markets, and America's schools. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution.

Elmore Richard F., Penelope Peterson, and Sarah McCarthy. 1996. Restructuring in the Classroom: Teaching, Learning, and School Organization. San Francisco: Jossey- Bass.

Fullan Michael. 1991. The New Meaning of Educational Change. New York: Teachers College Press.

Greene Jay P., Paul E. Peterson, and Jiangtao Du. 1998. "School Choice in Milwaukee: A Randomized Experiment." In Learning from School Choice, ed. Paul E. Peterson and Bryan C. Hassel. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution.

Hassel Bryan. 1998. "Charter Schools: Politics and Practice in Four States." In Learning from School Choice, ed. Paul E. Peterson and Bryan C. Hassel. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution.

Hess Frederick. 1999. Spinning Wheels: The Politics of Urban School Reform. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution.

Hoxby Caroline Minter. 1996. "The Effects of Private School Vouchers on Schools and Students." In Holding Schools Accountable: Performance Based Reform in Education, ed. Helen F. Ladd. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution.

_____. 1998. "Analyzing School Choice Reforms That Use America's Traditional Forms of Parental Choice." In Learning from School Choice, ed. Paul E. Peterson and Bryan C. Hassel. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution.

Johnson Susan Moore. 1996. Leading to Change: The Challenge of the New Superintendency. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

-140-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
School Choice in the Real World: Lessons from Arizona Charter Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1: Real World School Choice: Arizona Charter Schools 1
  • Notes 15
  • References 15
  • PART ONE Theoretical and National Perspectives 17
  • 2: And This Parent Went to Market: Education as Public Versus Private Good 19
  • Notes 35
  • Notes 36
  • 3: The Death of One Best Way: Charter Schools as Reinventing Government 39
  • Notes 55
  • References 55
  • 4: Congress and Charter Schools 58
  • Notes 65
  • Notes 67
  • 5: Charter Schools: A National Innovation, an Arizona Revolution 68
  • Notes 92
  • References 92
  • PART TWO Social Scientists Look at Arizona Charter Schools 97
  • 6: The Wild West of Education Reform: Arizona Charter Schools 99
  • References 114
  • 7: Why Arizona Embarked on School Reform (and Nevada Did Not) 115
  • References 127
  • 8: Do Charter Schools Improve District Schools? Three Approaches to the Question 129
  • Notes 139
  • Notes 140
  • 9: Closing Charters: How a Good Theory Failed in Practice 142
  • Conclusion and Recommendations for Policy Makers 156
  • Notes 158
  • References 158
  • 10: Nothing New: Curricula in Arizona Charter Schools 159
  • References 172
  • 11: How Arizona Teachers View School Reform 173
  • Notes 184
  • References 184
  • PART THREE Practitioners Look at Arizona Charter Schools 187
  • 12: The Empowerment of Market-Based School Reform 189
  • Notes 197
  • References 197
  • 13: A Voice from the State Legislature: Don'T Do What Arizona Did! 198
  • Notes 210
  • References 210
  • 14: Public Schools and the Charter Movement: An Emerging Relationship 212
  • Notes 220
  • References 220
  • 15: Whose Idea Was This Anyway? The Challenging Metamorphosis from Private to Charter 222
  • Notes 233
  • References 233
  • PART FOUR Lessons 235
  • 16: In Lieu of Conclusions: Tentative Lessons from a Contested Frontier 237
  • References 247
  • About the Editors and Contributors 249
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.