Military Deterrence in History: A Pilot Cross-Historical Survey

By Raoul Naroll; Vern L. Bullough et al. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

THE PRESENT VOLUME is a completely revised, recoded, recalculated, and much expanded version of "Deterrence in History," by Raoul Naroll .*

Our largest debt is owed to Thomas W. Milburn, director of Project Michelson at the Naval Ordnance Test Station, China Lake, California. He suggested the research, proposed the Palo Alto conference on our research design, and gave freely of his counsel throughout the project. Through Milburn and Project Michelson we are indebted to the United States Navy for its support of the entire project. Presumably the naval authorities must have hoped -- as we ourselves had hoped -- that our findings would have solidly supported the deterrence hypothesis. But when on the contrary we found deterrence apparently an unsuccessful strategy, there was never the slightest hint on the part of anyone concerned that we might hedge our report or shade our findings. In these times when support of social science research by the Department of Defense is frequently challenged, we would like to record our appreciation for generous funding and a completely free hand in our scientific policies, our interpretations and our publication of results.

The research was conducted partly under the auspices of the San Fernando Valley State College Foundation, partly under those of Northwestern University, and partly under those of the Institute for Cross-Cultural Research. Final computer runs and manuscript preparation were supported by the State University of New

____________________
*
In Theory and Research on the Causes of War, ed. Dean G. Pruitt and Richard C. Snyder ( Prentice Hall, 1969), pp. 150-64.

-lxi-

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