The Pacific Northwest: An Interpretive History

By Carlos Arnaldo Schwantes | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 21

The Politics of Anxiety and Affluence

"The State of Washington is famous in the nation's capital for its salmon, its
stability, and its United States senators. The salmon is matchless, and some
of the stability is probably illusory, but the contributions to the political
system made by such senators as Henry M. Jackson and Warren G. Magnu-
son are undisputed. In fairness, the name of Daniel J. Evans, especially as
governor, should be added to this equation. The common thread of Jack-
son's and Evans's political careers is a constructive independence that
avoids the extremes of the maverick or of rigid partisanship."--Louis S.
Cannon, Washington Post political reporter and National Public Radio's
Morning Edition commentator, Fall 1986 Pettyjohn Lecture

During the decade of the 1950s, a majority of voters in all three Pacific Northwest states twice turned to Dwight D. Eisenhower, the popular general who had helped win World War II and who as president of the United States seemed the ideal person to fight the Cold War. He offered comfort during a decade of anxiety: to the New York Times, Ike resembled "everybody's grandfather."

It was possible to become too complacent during a time of unpredictable changes, as the world of popular music discovered. Hits of the early 1950s were safe and comfortable ditties like "Lady of Spain," "Doggie in the Window," and "Catch a Falling Star." But when popular music became too predictable, too lifeless, or too sweet for the generation of baby boomers, an increasing number of young people turned to the pounding new sound of

-454-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Pacific Northwest: An Interpretive History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 568

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.