chapter 16

THE certainty that he was not going to be accepted by the McKelveys made Babbitt feel guilty and a little absurd. But he went more regularly to the Elks; at a Chamber of Commerce luncheon he was oratorical regarding the wickedness of strikes; and again he saw himself as a Prominent Citizen.

His clubs and associations were food comfortable to his spirit.

Of a decent man in Zenith it was required that he should belong to one, preferably two or three, of the innumerous "lodges" and prosperity-boosting lunch-clubs; to the Rotarians, the Kiwanis, or the Boosters; to the Oddfellows, Moose, Masons, Red Men, Woodmen, Owls, Eagles, Maccabees, Knights of Pythias, Knights of Columbus, and other secret orders characterized by a high degree of heartiness, sound morals, and reverence for the Constitution. There were four reasons for joining these orders: It was the thing to do. It was good for business, since lodge-brothers frequently became customers. It gave to Americans unable to become Geheimräte or Commendatori such unctuous honorifics as High Worthy Recording Scribe and Grand Hoogow to add

-166-

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Babbitt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Chapter 1 5
  • Chapter 2 15
  • Chapter 3 23
  • Chapter 4 34
  • Chapter 5 44
  • Chapter 6 57
  • Chapter 7 77
  • Chapter 8 87
  • Chapter 9 102
  • Chapter 10 110
  • Chapter 11 122
  • 12 Chapter 127
  • Chapter 13 130
  • Chapter 14 145
  • Chapter 15 156
  • Chapter 16 166
  • Chapter 17 174
  • Chapter 18 182
  • Chapter 19 191
  • Chapter 20 203
  • Chapter 21 209
  • Chapter 22 214
  • Chapter 23 218
  • Chapter 24 226
  • Chapter 25 236
  • Chapter 26 242
  • Chapter 27 249
  • Chapter 28 256
  • Chapter 29 265
  • Chapter 30 279
  • Chapter 31 288
  • Chapter 32 294
  • Chapter 33 303
  • Chapter 34 311
  • AFTERWORD 320
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