CHAPTER THREE
Truth, Taste and the Supersensible

WE GENERALLY MANAGE TO READ the Critique independently of the idealistic metaphysic so central to Kant's thought elsewhere. At one important juncture, though, that current erupts in dramatic and puzzling fashion. I have in mind the sections of the book that present, and purportedly resolve, the antinomy of taste (§§56 and 57, together with the two immediately following Remarks). Kant is concerned there to situate the beautiful in its proper conceptual niche, and he appears to do this by unreservedly rooting it in the supersensible substrate of phenomena. When such stress has already been laid on the fundamentally subjective nature of the aesthetic, this unannounced appearance of the hyperobjective takes one aback. It is not at all easy to grasp what is afoot, and hard to believe that good sense is not making way for idle mystification.


I

The problem arises from a desire to allow that taste is possible at all, a thought that brings with it the implication that aesthetic judgments are evaluable as true or false, correct or incorrect. 'Each to his own taste' puts paid to that, one might suppose; but Kant is firm. To endorse the familiar banality would be to abandon all idea of taste whatsoever, since for each of us to have our own taste is a strict impossibility (§7.2). Privatising aesthetic estimates in this way could only be a move of last resort.

Setting aside this ultimately sceptical option, then, Kant holds that we are bound to endorse two seemingly opposed ideas: one, that there is no disputing about taste; the other, that it does permit

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Kantian Aesthetics Pursued
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface v
  • Chapter One - Taste, Perception and Experience 1
  • Notes 15
  • Chapter Two - Necessity and Taste 17
  • Notes 39
  • Chapter Three - Truth, Taste and the Supersensible 41
  • Notes 62
  • Chapter Four - Hume, Kant and the Standard of Taste 64
  • Notes 84
  • Chapter Five - The Idealism of Purposiveness 87
  • Notes 98
  • Chapter Six - The Possibility of Art 101
  • Notes 121
  • Chapter Seven - Music 124
  • Notes 153
  • Chapter Eight - Architecture and Sculpture 157
  • Index of Topics 181
  • Index Locorum 182
  • Index of Names 184
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 184

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.