idealism nor realism, but indifference or neutrality between the two.


NOTES
1.
Even Kant appears to experience some difficulty here. Because there is no purpose, either objective or subjective, he says that we are concerned only with the form of purposiveness. To the casual reader, that is anything but clear in purport.
2.
The interpretation goes back a long way, and perhaps it is rooted in Kant's own footnote to the summary sentence of §17. In 1892, J. H. Bernard uses the contrast of 'we judge the form of the object to be purposive, but cannot explain any purpose served by it' (formal and subjective purposiveness) with 'we have a definite notion of what it is adapted for' (real and objective) (Translator's Introduction, p. xvii, Hafner Library of Classics, New York, 1961). More recently, see inter alia E. Schaper, 'Configurations that appear patterned in conformity of parts without our being able to say what the pattern is for, except that it seems to be for our enjoyment', Studies in Kant's Aesthetics ( Edinburgh, 1979), p. 125; also, to my chagrin, my Aesthetic Reconstructions ( Oxford, 1987), p. 182, which I here disavow. An explicit instance of the move to indeterminate (i.e. unknown) purpose in order to avoid the apparent contradiction in the phrase 'purposiveness without a purpose' is J. Kulenkampff Kants Logik des Ästhetischen Urteils, Frankfurt ( 1978), p. 121.
3.
It would be quite unrealistic to insist in the analysis of beauty that we be ignorant of the purpose (cf. Schaper; or Kulenkampff, p. 121). Were we to lose our innocence, that would scarcely deprive the objects which we admire of their beauty.
4.
It is this to which Kant refers in the rubric of §58 as 'the unique principle of the aesthetic judgment'. It is stated explicitly at §58.10; but, to understand what Kant says there, we have to know that, by saying that the judgment of taste has a priori validity for everyone, he means only that the subject's own response provides a conceptually guaranteed warrant for an assertion whose truth condition involves universal response.
5.
Bleak too, it should be said, is the connection with the thought that if the pleasure is not in fact universally shared, it is one that ought to be. Kant shows that he does not forget this aspect of things at §58.9.
6.
For instance at Intro. VII.
7.
However it will be so under a different description, given (say) in chemical or mechanical terms rather than in terms of its utility. By contrast, when a 'real' purpose accounts for the origin there, Kant seems to believe that there is no alternative mechanical explanation to be had. I take it that he is here thinking of explanation expressed in the same terms. There is muddle here, but we are not obliged to follow him anyway.
8.
For example, F. Heintel, Die Bedeutung der Kritik der ästhetischen Urteilskraft für die transcendentale Systematik ( Bonn, 1970), p. 63. Also Kulenkampff, who uses the perception to introduce his own version of the traditional reading.

-98-

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Kantian Aesthetics Pursued
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface v
  • Chapter One - Taste, Perception and Experience 1
  • Notes 15
  • Chapter Two - Necessity and Taste 17
  • Notes 39
  • Chapter Three - Truth, Taste and the Supersensible 41
  • Notes 62
  • Chapter Four - Hume, Kant and the Standard of Taste 64
  • Notes 84
  • Chapter Five - The Idealism of Purposiveness 87
  • Notes 98
  • Chapter Six - The Possibility of Art 101
  • Notes 121
  • Chapter Seven - Music 124
  • Notes 153
  • Chapter Eight - Architecture and Sculpture 157
  • Index of Topics 181
  • Index Locorum 182
  • Index of Names 184
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