Acknowledgements

This book is the result of an interest in governmental rules that has been sustained over a number of years. During that period I have worked with a series of co-authors to whom I owe a great debt. Many of the ideas that follow owe their origins to these colleagues and I express my particular gratitude to Christopher McCrudden, Keith Hawkins, Terence Daintith, and Cento Veljanovski.

My thanks also to erstwhile colleagues at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Wolfson College, Oxford and former Director, Donald Harris for their support during my work in Oxford and since; to the Health and Safety Commission and Executive and the Factory Inspectorate for their assistance in my study of field enforcement. My particular thanks are offered to all the FI Inspectors who allowed me to accompany them on visits to premises.

Many academics and regulators have read drafts, suggested (or supplied) books, offered ideas, and pointed out errors -- I am grateful to all who have assisted me in such ways and especially to Jill Anderson, Louise Ashon, Keir Ashton, Caroline Bradley, Inkeri Turkki, Erika Szyszczak, Daniel Bethlehem, Carol Harlow, Richard Rawlings, Joe Jacob, Damien Chalmers, Ross Cranston, Judith Freedman, Ken McGuire, Paul Fenn, Sir David Walker, and the anonymous OUP readers.

The draft manuscript was produced in the main by ballpoint pen (some sections were scratched on a cave wall with a bone) and a huge debt of thanks accordingly is owed to Yanci Harper for her endless patience, good humour, and skill on the word processor. I express my gratitude also to Geraldine Tully and Pamela Hodges for their assistance to Yanci at various points, and to Stephen Rippington for his artwork.

Finally, for her support in all ways during the writing period -- ranging from reading and commenting to suffering mental absences -- I thank Vanessa Finch.

R.B.

-xv-

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