Erasmus, Utopia, and the Jesuits: Essays on the Outreach of Humanism

By John C. Olin | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
On this influence see also John W. O'Malley, S. J., "Renaissance Humanism and the Religious Culture of the First Jesuits", The Heythrop Journal, 31 ( 1990), 471-87, and "Was Ignatius Loyola a Church Reformer: How to Look at Early Modern Catholicism", The Catholic Historical Review, 77 ( 1991), 182-83. Note especially Father O'Malley recent The First Jesuits ( Cambridge, Mass., 1993).
2.
See, for example, Charles Trinkaus, In Our Image and Likeness: Humanity and Divinity in Italian Humanist Thought, 2 vols. ( Chicago, 1970). As for Erasmus, see my "Interpreting Erasmus", in Six Essays on Erasmus ( New York, 1979), chap. 5, pp. 57-73.
3.
"Erasmus and St. Ignatius Loyola", in Six Essays on Erasmus, chap. 6, pp. 75-92.
4.
On early Jesuit education and the first colleges, see Allan P. Farrell , S. J., The Jesuit Code of Liberal Education ( Milwaukee, 1938), and Gabriel Codina Mir, S. J., Aux sources de la pédagogie des Jésuits: Le 'modus parisiensis' ( Rome, 1968).
5.
Elisabeth F. Hirsch, Erasmus and Portugal, Bibliothèque d'humanisme et renaissance, 32 ( 1970), 539-57, is informative on this theme.
6.
See my "Eloquentia, Eruditio, Fides: Erasmus' Life of Jerome", in Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Sanctandreani, ed. I. D. McFarlane ( Binghamton, N.Y., 1986), pp. 269-74. The English translation of the Life is in CWE 61, pp. 15-62. See also pp. 11-14 above.
7.
See Farrell, Jesuit Code of Liberal Education, pp. 247-51.
8.
The Autobiography of St. Ignatius Loyola, trans. Joseph F. O'Callaghan , ed. John C. Olin ( New York, 1992).
9.
It is a point also well made in the opening pages of George E. Ganss , S. J., Saint Ignatius' Idea of a Jesuit University ( Milwaukee, 1954).
10.
I quote this from an interview with Father Kolvenbach that appeared in America, September 29, 1990.
11.
Allan Bloom widely read The Closing of the American Mind ( New York, 1987) springs to mind, as does an even more specific

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