CHAPTER III

AS YET the political affairs of her native land had not been brought to the notice of the Princess: in- -deed until the time of her accession to the throne there is not one mention of Whigs or Tories in these pages. When she was fifteen her beloved Feodore, whom she had not seen for six years, came on a visit to her mother, with her husband Prince Ernest Hohenlohe and her two children, and the King asked them all down to Windsor for Ascot. In the autumn the Duchess took a house at St. Leonards for three months, receiving, as usual, a loyal ad- -dress from the Mayor and Corporation. The air was brisk after the fogs of Kensington: there were nice walks; she liked to see the people strolling on the Esplanade, and for events they had a carriage accident (in which the Princess's first thought was to get Dashy out of the rumble) and a wreck. She described the grief of the widows of the drowned men, "decent looking, tidy and nice people," and their gratification at the recovery of the bodies. Mr. Davys, now promoted to be Dean of Chester, gave her daily les- -sons, and other tutors came down, but besides these she made employments for herself, reading French History and Racine with Lehzen out of hours: and again there emerges a trait most characteristic of her maturity: "I love to be employed; I hate to be idle." The beauties of Nature began to take her eye, and we have a very careful word­

-32-

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  • Title Page *
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Note *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 15
  • Chapter III 32
  • Chapter IV 49
  • Chapter V 66
  • Chapter VI 74
  • Chapter VII 97
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter IX 142
  • Chapter X 158
  • Chapter XI 168
  • Chapter XII 186
  • Chapter XIII 203
  • Chapter XIV 218
  • Chapter XV 239
  • Chapter XVI 263
  • Chapter XVII 277
  • Chapter XVIII 306
  • Chapter XIX 335
  • Chapter XX 357
  • Chapter XXI 383
  • Index 399
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