CHAPTER XV

I

Six years had now nearly elapsed since the marriage of the Prince of Wales in 1863, and the Queen's refusal to give him work or responsibilities that should occupy him grew inveterate. In this her practice was sharply at variance with her avowed principles, for she wrote to Mr. Gladstoneà propos of Prince Arthur "The Queen is anxious to keep him employed as other young men, and above all not idling at home, exposed to the many temptations which beset all young men -- but Princes more than any others."* The Prince of Wales's education, made up by the Prince Consort and Stockmar like a prescription to render him a replica of his father, had had, it might be said, precisely the opposite effect, and his mother realized that, for she sent the Crown Princess what might almost be considered a warning note about the upbringing of her William. "I often think too great care, too much constant watching leads to the very dangers hereafter which one wishes to avoid." Nor could the most fanatic believer in heredity trace any sort of natural resemblance between father and son. The Prince Consort was by taste and inclination a student and a lover of the Arts: his son never opened a book nor cared a jot about any form of Art except French comedy. The one regarded social intercourse as a relaxation when work was done but otherwise a waste of

____________________
*
Guedalla, The Queen and Mr. Gladstone, i, p. 193.

-239-

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  • Title Page *
  • List of Illustrations *
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  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 15
  • Chapter III 32
  • Chapter IV 49
  • Chapter V 66
  • Chapter VI 74
  • Chapter VII 97
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter IX 142
  • Chapter X 158
  • Chapter XI 168
  • Chapter XII 186
  • Chapter XIII 203
  • Chapter XIV 218
  • Chapter XV 239
  • Chapter XVI 263
  • Chapter XVII 277
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  • Chapter XIX 335
  • Chapter XX 357
  • Chapter XXI 383
  • Index 399
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