Nativism and Slavery: The Northern Know Nothings and the Politics of the 1850's

By Tyler Anbinder | Go to book overview

Index
Adams, Charles Francis, 97; belief in inevitability of Whig defeat ( 1852), 16
Aiken, William: as Democratic candidate for House Speaker, 200, 201; supported by South Americans, 201
Allen, Charles B., Know Nothing founder, xix, 20-21
Allen, Stephen M., 216, 217
American Catholic Bishops, First Plenary Council of, 24
American party, xviii; abolishes office of party president, 247; campaign tactics of, 223; charges of Catholicism against Frémont by, 223, 224; comparison of 1854 with 1856 campaign, 226; confidence of leadership despite poor showing in 1856 elections, 247; decline after 1856, 246; distinguished from Know Nothing movement, xviii; infusion of former leaders into Republican party, 273; Louisville convention ( 1857), 247; revival of ( 1886), 272; shadow of original Know Nothing movement, 226; shift of support to border states, 247; Ullmann attempts to resurrect in 1870s, 271. See also Know Nothing party
American Protective Association, 272
American Protestant Association, 110, 110-Iln; president a Know Nothing, 81n
American Reform ticket, in Ohio ( 1854), 69
American Republican party: convention, 12; effect of Philadelphia riots on, 12; in election of 1852, 16; formation of, 11; name changed to Native American party, 12; success of, 11, 12
Anglican church, and Know Nothings, 49
Anti-Catholicism: as cause of Know Nothing victory in Pennsylvania ( 1854), 66; continues after Civil War, 271; Fillmore criticized for lack of record on, 210-11; as issue in New York ( 1855), 185; as Know Nothing tenet, 104; as political issue in Boston, 32; reemergence of in 1830s, 9; reflected in Ohio church-property law, 258; replaced by anti-radicalism as emphasis of American nativism, 272; role of in Massachusetts election ( 1854), 94
Anti-slavery sentiment: as common component of Know Nothing U.S. Senate choices, 145ff.; in Indiana election ( 1854), 72; as issue in Massachusetts ( 1854), 91; as issue in New York ( 1855), 185; as issue in Seward reelection, 149; Know Nothing convention split caused by, 170-73; as Know Nothing tenet, 44, 45, 106; as main impetus to growth of Know Nothing party, 100, 101; in Massachusetts ( 1855), 190; in Massachusetts Know Nothing legislative program, 154-56, 157; in Ohio election ( 1854), 70; in Pennsylvania election ( 1854), 66; strength of in Connecticut, 212; as U.S. Senate campaign issue in Massachusetts, 145-46. See also Slavery
Assimilation, Know Nothing position on, 107
Attorneys. See Lawyers
Babcock, James F., predicts Know Nothing demise, 253
Bailey, Gamaliel, 175
Baird, Thomas H., 59
Baker, George E., 76

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