In the Past Lane: Historical Perspectives on American Culture

By Michael Kammen | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
See Peter Novick, That Noble Dream: The "Objectivity Question" and the American Historical Profession ( New York, 1988).
2.
See Kammen, essay-review concerning collective memory, History and Theory 34, no. 3 ( 1995):245-61.
3.
Quoted in Robert Coles, Erik H. Erikson: The Growth of His Work ( Boston, 1970),181.
4.
Thompson, Customs in Common: Studies in Traditional Popular Culture ( New York, 1990), 13; James Hoopes, Van Wyck Brooks: In Search of American Culture ( Amherst, Mass., 1977), 39.
5.
See Daniel Walker Howe,ed., Victorian America( Philadelphia, 1976), 5; Alan Trachtenberg , The Incorporation of America: Culture and Society in the Gilded Age ( New York, 1982), 9, 143.
6.
Williams, Culture and Society, 1780- 1950 ( London, 1958); Williams, "Culture Is Ordinary", in Williams, Resources of Hope: Culture, Democracy, and Socialism ( London, 1989), 41-55.
7.
Emerson, "The American Scholar", in Robert E. Spiller, ed., Nature, Addresses, and Lectures ( Cambridge, Mass., 1979), 65; Jacques Barzun is quoted in David Brion Davis, "Some Recent Directions in American Cultural History", American Historical Review 73 ( Feb. 1968): 697.
8.
Huizinga, "The Task of Cultural History" ( 1929) in Huizinga, Men and Ideas: Essays ( New York, 1959), 64.
9.
See Kuno Francke, "The Study of National Culture", Atlantic Monthly 99 ( March 1907): 409-16; Benedict, Patterns of Culture ( Boston, 1934); Fairbank, "Probing the Chinese Mind -- Reports from Two U.S. Experts", U.S. News and World Report 71 ( Sept. 6, 1971): 80.
10.
See also Kammen, Mystic Chords of Memory: The Transformation of Tradition in American Culture ( New York, 1991); Kammen, Meadows of Memory: Images of Time and Tradition in American Art and Culture ( Austin, Tex., 1992); Kammen, essay-review in History and Theory 34, no. 3 ( 1995): 245-61; and Kammen, "Public History and the Uses of Memory", in Public Historian 19 ( Spring 1997): 53-56.
11.
Pierre Bourdieu and Alain Darbel, L'Amour de l'art: Les Musées et leur public ( Paris, 1966), esp. 114, 147; and see Kammen, "Charles Burchfield and 'the Procession of the Seasons", in Nannette V. Maciejunes, ed., On the Middle Border: The Art of Charles E. Burchfield ( New York, 1997),38-49.
12.
Barzun, "Distrust of Brains", The Nation 160 ( Jan. 6, 1945): 18-19; Beard to Barzun, Jan. 6,1945, Barzun papers, Manuscripts and Special Collections, Butler Library, Columbia University, New York.

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