A Dictionary of the Characters in the Waverley Novels of Sir Walter Scott

By M. F. A. Husband | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

THIS book is intended as a work of reference for the student and lover of the Waverley Novels, and, in a minor degree, for the humanist who sees in Scott a noble nature worthy of closer acquaintance. Its aim is that of a Dictionary and not an Encyclopædia--an identification and description, rather than a condensed narrative, of the multitude of characters created by Sir Walter. No fewer than 2836 characters are comprised in the Dictionary, and these include 37 horses and 33 dogs.

Some of the historical errors which appear in the Novels have been corrected in the Dictionary: see, for example, the Notes page 76, col. 2; p. 175, col. 1; p. 229, col. 1, and p. 271, col. 2. Short notes have been inserted as to the prototype of Jeanie Deans (p. 68), and Old Mortality (p. 198); and Scott's acknowledgment of his indebtedness to Mrs. Bethune Baliol in respect of the substratum of his Scottish fictions is reproduced on p. 16.

Comparatively few instances occur in which glossary notes are necessary, and these have, for convenience, been shown immediately after the passages in which the necessity for them arises, instead of being collected to form a Glossary separate from the Dictionary.

In the table of Novels which precedes the Dictionary proper, no attempt has been made to summarise the respective stories. It is hoped, however, that the chronological and other notes therein contained will prove of service in connection with the study of an author whose writings did much to stimulate that "historical sense" which was one of the richest gains of the human mind in the nineteenth century, and whose wide-ranging genius and sunny sympathies continue to win the affectionate attention and admiration of English-speaking readers throughout the world a hundred years after the preparation of his first Novel.

ELDERSLEA,
MUSSELBURGH, SCOTLAND,
1910.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Dictionary of the Characters in the Waverley Novels of Sir Walter Scott
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • INTRODUCTORY NOTE vii
  • TABLE OF THE WAVERLEY NOVELS ix
  • Dictionary Of The Waverley Novels 1
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.