Leadership in Times of Change: A Handbook for Communication and Media Administrators

By William G. Christ | Go to book overview
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Clearly articulated criteria that are written and widely distributed.
Adequate information, covering a sufficient span of time, to identify a pattern of academic excellence.
Continual communication between the candidate and the department chair as promotion materials are being prepared, among the communication administrators and relevant committees as the dossier is being evaluated, and among the dean's office and central administration as the dossier is being reviewed and discussed at that level.
Sufficient feedback after the evaluation so that the candidate and others involved in the process understand the reasons for the decision(s).
Members of the promotion committee are also members of the department and as such should serve as ongoing mentors to faculty as part of the evaluation and promotion processes.
If faculty evaluation is to be regarded as the preeminent component of faculty development, communication administrators must implement this process, whatever its ultimate purpose, with the same commitment to communication that they reflect in the classroom, the laboratory, and the field. In short, they must practice what they teach, illustrating that the process of evaluating faculty is one of the most important forms of human interaction within a university.
APPENDIX: ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Arreola R. A. ( 1995). Developing a comprehensive faculty evaluation system. Bolton, MA: Anker.
Braskamp L. A., & Ory J. C. ( 1994). Assessing faculty work. San Francisco: JosseyBass.
Centra J. A., Froh R. C., Gray P. J., & Lambert L. M. ( 1987). A guide to evaluating teaching for promotion and tenure. Acton, MA: Copley.
Diamond R. M. ( 1994). Serving on promotion and tenure committees: a faculty guide. Bolton, MA: Anker.
Diamond R. M. ( 1995). Preparing for promotion and tenure review: A faculty guide. Bolton, MA: Anker.
Dilts D. A., Haber L. J., & Bialik D. ( 1994). Assessing what professors do. Westport, CT. Greenwood.
Seldin P., and Associates (Eds.). ( 1990). How administrators can improve teaching: Moving from talk to action in higher education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

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Leadership in Times of Change: A Handbook for Communication and Media Administrators
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