The Desegregated Heart: A Virginian's Stand in Time of Transition

By Sarah Patton Boyle | Go to book overview

The Desegregated Heart
A VIRGINIAN'S STAND IN TIME OF TRANSITION

BY Sarah Patton Boyle

WILLIAM MORROW & COMPANY
New York, 1962

-iii-

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The Desegregated Heart: A Virginian's Stand in Time of Transition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • DEDICATION vii
  • Contents ix
  • AUTHOR'S NOTE xi
  • Part 1 - THE SOUTHERN NEVER-NEVER LAND 1
  • Chapter 1 - Intangible Assets 3
  • Chapter 2 - The Rising Wall 10
  • Chapter 3 - The Southern Code 21
  • Chapter 4 - Product of the Code 29
  • Chapter 5 - The Tidal Wave 43
  • Chapter 6 - Everybody Else Is Prejudiced 53
  • Chapter 7 - Noncommittal Answers 61
  • Chapter 8 - We Want a Negro 70
  • Chapter 9 - Library Liberals 78
  • Chapter 10 - I Nearly Die Aborning 86
  • Chapter 11 - Hurt Until You Give 93
  • Chapter 12 - Not a White Lady Slummimg 102
  • Chapter 13 - Convex and Concave 110
  • Chapter 14 - Once to Every Man and Nation 117
  • Chapter 15 - The Semantic Barrier 126
  • Chapter 16 - No Ears to Hear 132
  • Chapter 17 - Mirrors and Candles 143
  • Chapter 18 - Facts and Figures of Good Will 154
  • Chapter 19 - Jeffersoman Americans 167
  • Part 2 - BLOODLESS DESTRUCTION 177
  • Chapter 1 - "I Will Not Run" 179
  • Chapter 2 - The Public Education Hearing 189
  • Chapter 3 - The Power of Positive Thinking 197
  • Chapter 4 - The Middle of the Pyramid 206
  • Chapter 5 - "Set Not Your Faith in Princes or in Any Child of Man" PSALM 146 214
  • Chapter 6 - The Wall 226
  • Chapter 7 - "Discussions" 233
  • Chapter 8 - Insults 240
  • Chapter 9 - Threats 245
  • Chapter 10 - No Hiding Place 255
  • Chapter 11 - The Power of Evil 262
  • Chapter 12 - The Kiss of Death 270
  • Chapter 13 - Whitewashed Tombs 279
  • Chapter 14 - Discredited Currency 289
  • Part 3 - THOU SHALT LOVE 295
  • Chapter 1 - Decision 297
  • Chapter 2 - Love 308
  • Chapter 3 - Service 318
  • Chapter 4 - Man 325
  • Chapter 5 - God 334
  • Chapter 6 - Christ 344
  • Chapter 7 - Children -- of God 357
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