Italian Baroque and Rococo Architecture

By John Varriano | Go to book overview

9
Guarino Guarini

The most remarkable of all north Italian architects was Guarino Guarini, a man whose intellectual and creative energies surpassed even those of the better-known Borromini, Bernini, and Cortona. Born in 1624 in Modena, Guarini was a generation younger than the three great masters of the Roman Baroque and the one least bound by conventional practice. In 1647, after eight years of study in Rome, he took the vows of the Theatine order and subsequently taught philosophy, theology, and mathematics in Theatine seminaries in Modena, Messina, and Paris. His academic interests were further manifested in the publication of nine scholarly treatises on topics ranging from astronomy-he was among the last defenders. of the geocentric concept of the universe -- to philosophy, mathematics, and architecture. One of the culminating honors in his amazingly successful career was his appointment in 1680 as theologian to the Prince of Carignano in Turin. At that time he was praised by his new patron for the "ingenious and extraordinary principles" of his architecture, which were combined with "the most excellent knowledge of the philosophical, moral, and theological sciences as befits a zealous and worthy member of a religious order."1

Guarini profited from his dual role of priest-architect as few others have. During his career he was asked to design projects for Theatine churches in Lisbon, Munich, Nice, Paris, Prague, and in his native Italy, and his international reputation as an architect exceeded even that of Bernini. Yet few of his projects outside of Italy were executed according to plan; and not one survives to the present day. 2 Fortu

-209-

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Italian Baroque and Rococo Architecture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - Precursors of the Roman Baroque: Vignola to Carlo Maderno 19
  • 3 - Francesco Borromini 45
  • 4 - Gianlorenzo Bernini 75
  • 5 - Pietro da Cortona 107
  • 6 - Other Aspects of the Roman Baroque 125
  • 7 - Rococoand Academic Classicism in Eighteenth-Century Rome 159
  • 8 - Northern Italy in the Seventeenth Century 183
  • 9 - Guarino Guarini 209
  • 10 - Northern Italy in the Eighteenth Century 229
  • 11 - Southern Italy 261
  • Glossary 309
  • Illustration Credits 313
  • Index 319
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