CHAPTER III

A BOUT an hour and a half before daylight we were bowling along smoothly over the road-- so smoothly that our cradle only rocked in a gentle, lulling way, that was gradually soothing us to sleep, and dulling our consciousness--when something gave away under us! We were dimly aware of it, but indifferent to it. The coach stopped. We heard the driver and conductor talking together outside, and rummaging for a lantern, and swearing because they could not find it--but we had no interest in whatever had happened, and it only added to our comfort to think of those people out there at work in the murky night, and we snug in our nest with the curtains drawn. But presently, by the sounds, there seemed to be an examination going on, and then the driver's voice said:

"By George, the thoroughbrace is broke!"

This startled me broad awake--as an undefined sense of calamity is always apt to do. I said to myself: "Now, a thoroughbrace is probably part of a horse; and doubtless a vital part, too, from the dismay in the driver's voice. Leg, maybe--and yet how could he break his leg waltzing along such a road as this? No, it can't be his leg. That is impossible, unless he was reaching for the driver. Now,

-10-

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Roughing It - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • PREFATORY *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 4
  • Chapter III 10
  • Chapter IV 19
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 37
  • Chapter VII 43
  • Chapter VIII 52
  • Chapter IX 57
  • Chapter X 63
  • Chapter XI 73
  • Chapter XII 81
  • Chapter XIII 93
  • Chapter XIV 98
  • Chapter XV 102
  • Chapter XVI 110
  • Chapter XVII 120
  • Chapter XVIII 126
  • Chapter XIX 131
  • Chapter XX 136
  • Chapter XXI 144
  • Chapter XXII 155
  • Chapter XXIII 161
  • Chapter XXIV 168
  • Chapter XXV 175
  • Chapter XXVI 183
  • Chapter XXVII 189
  • Chapter XXVIII 194
  • Chapter XXIX 201
  • Chapter XXX 207
  • Chapter XXXI 213
  • Chapter XXXII 224
  • Chapter XXXIII 230
  • Chapter XXXIV 234
  • Chapter XXXV 241
  • Chapter XXXVI 245
  • Chapter XXXVII 252
  • Chapter XXXVIII 259
  • Chapter Xxxix 264
  • Chapter XL 271
  • Chapter XLI 280
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