CHAPTER V

A NOTHER night of alternate tranquillity and turmoil. But morning came, by and by. It was another glad awakening to fresh breezes, vast expanses of level greensward, bright sunlight, an impressive solitude utterly without visible human beings or human habitations, and an atmosphere of such amazing magnifying properties that trees that seemed close at hand were more than three miles away. We resumed undress uniform, climbed atop of the flying coach, dangled our legs over the side, shouted occasionally at our frantic mules, merely to see them lay their ears back and scamper faster, tied our hats on to keep our hair from blowing away, and leveled an outlook over the world-wide carpet about us for things new and strange to gaze at. Even at this day it thrills me through and through to think of the life, the gladness and the wild sense of freedom that used to make the blood dance in my veins on those fine overland mornings!

Along about an hour after breakfast we saw the first prairie-dog villages, the first antelope, and the first wolf. If I remember rightly, this latter was the regular coyote (pronounced ky-o-te) of the farther deserts. And if it was, he was not a pretty creature, or respectable either, for I got well acquainted with

-31-

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Roughing It - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • PREFATORY *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 4
  • Chapter III 10
  • Chapter IV 19
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 37
  • Chapter VII 43
  • Chapter VIII 52
  • Chapter IX 57
  • Chapter X 63
  • Chapter XI 73
  • Chapter XII 81
  • Chapter XIII 93
  • Chapter XIV 98
  • Chapter XV 102
  • Chapter XVI 110
  • Chapter XVII 120
  • Chapter XVIII 126
  • Chapter XIX 131
  • Chapter XX 136
  • Chapter XXI 144
  • Chapter XXII 155
  • Chapter XXIII 161
  • Chapter XXIV 168
  • Chapter XXV 175
  • Chapter XXVI 183
  • Chapter XXVII 189
  • Chapter XXVIII 194
  • Chapter XXIX 201
  • Chapter XXX 207
  • Chapter XXXI 213
  • Chapter XXXII 224
  • Chapter XXXIII 230
  • Chapter XXXIV 234
  • Chapter XXXV 241
  • Chapter XXXVI 245
  • Chapter XXXVII 252
  • Chapter XXXVIII 259
  • Chapter Xxxix 264
  • Chapter XL 271
  • Chapter XLI 280
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