CHAPTER XV

I T is a luscious country for thrilling evening stories about assassinations of intractable Gentiles. I cannot easily conceive of anything more cozy than the night in Salt Lake which we spent in a Gentile den, smoking pipes and listening to tales of how Burton galloped in among the pleading and defenseless "Morisites" and shot them down, men and women, like so many dogs. And how Bill Hickman, a Destroying Angel, shot Drown and Arnold dead for bringing suit against him for a debt. And how Porter Rockwell did this and that dreadful thing. And how heedless people often come to Utah and make remarks about Brigham, or polygamy, or some other sacred matter, and the very next morning at daylight such parties are sure to be found lying up some back alley, contentedly waiting for the hearse. And the next most interesting thing is to sit and listen to these Gentiles talk about polygamy; and how some portly old frog of an elder, or a bishop, marries a girl--likes her, marries her sister--likes her, marries another sister--likes her, takes another--likes her, marries her mother--likes her, marries her father, grandfather, great grandfather, and then comes back hungry and asks for more. And how the pert young thing of eleven will chance to be the

-102-

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Roughing It - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • PREFATORY *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 4
  • Chapter III 10
  • Chapter IV 19
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 37
  • Chapter VII 43
  • Chapter VIII 52
  • Chapter IX 57
  • Chapter X 63
  • Chapter XI 73
  • Chapter XII 81
  • Chapter XIII 93
  • Chapter XIV 98
  • Chapter XV 102
  • Chapter XVI 110
  • Chapter XVII 120
  • Chapter XVIII 126
  • Chapter XIX 131
  • Chapter XX 136
  • Chapter XXI 144
  • Chapter XXII 155
  • Chapter XXIII 161
  • Chapter XXIV 168
  • Chapter XXV 175
  • Chapter XXVI 183
  • Chapter XXVII 189
  • Chapter XXVIII 194
  • Chapter XXIX 201
  • Chapter XXX 207
  • Chapter XXXI 213
  • Chapter XXXII 224
  • Chapter XXXIII 230
  • Chapter XXXIV 234
  • Chapter XXXV 241
  • Chapter XXXVI 245
  • Chapter XXXVII 252
  • Chapter XXXVIII 259
  • Chapter Xxxix 264
  • Chapter XL 271
  • Chapter XLI 280
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