CHAPTER XXXVII

I T was somewhere in the neighborhood of Mono Lake that the marvelous Whiteman cement-mine was supposed to lie. Every now and then it would be reported that Mr. W. had paissed stealthily through Esmeralda at dead of night, in disguise, and then we would have a wild excitement--because he must be steering for his secret mine, and now was the time to follow him. In less than three hours after daylight all the horses and mules and donkeys in the vicinity would be bought, hired, or stolen, and half the community would be off for the mountains, following in the wake of Whiteman. But W. would drift about through the mountain gorges for days together, in a purposeless sort of way, until the provisions of the miners ran out, and they would have to go back home. I have known it reported at eleven at night, in a large mining-camp, that Whiteman had just passed through, and in two hours the streets, so quiet before, would be swarming with men and animals. Every individual would be trying to be very secret, but yet venturing to whisper to just one neighbor that W. had passed through. And long before daylight--this in the dead of winter--the stampede would be complete, the camp deserted, and the whole population gone chasing after W.

-252-

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Roughing It - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • PREFATORY *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 4
  • Chapter III 10
  • Chapter IV 19
  • Chapter V 31
  • Chapter VI 37
  • Chapter VII 43
  • Chapter VIII 52
  • Chapter IX 57
  • Chapter X 63
  • Chapter XI 73
  • Chapter XII 81
  • Chapter XIII 93
  • Chapter XIV 98
  • Chapter XV 102
  • Chapter XVI 110
  • Chapter XVII 120
  • Chapter XVIII 126
  • Chapter XIX 131
  • Chapter XX 136
  • Chapter XXI 144
  • Chapter XXII 155
  • Chapter XXIII 161
  • Chapter XXIV 168
  • Chapter XXV 175
  • Chapter XXVI 183
  • Chapter XXVII 189
  • Chapter XXVIII 194
  • Chapter XXIX 201
  • Chapter XXX 207
  • Chapter XXXI 213
  • Chapter XXXII 224
  • Chapter XXXIII 230
  • Chapter XXXIV 234
  • Chapter XXXV 241
  • Chapter XXXVI 245
  • Chapter XXXVII 252
  • Chapter XXXVIII 259
  • Chapter Xxxix 264
  • Chapter XL 271
  • Chapter XLI 280
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