Rebellion and Factionalism in a Chinese Province: Zhejiang, 1966-1976

By Keith Forster | Go to book overview

Chapter Six
THE REESTABLISHMENT OF CIVILIAN RULE, 1972-73

This chapter discusses the factional politics of the years 1972-73. With the removal of Lin's military followers in 1972, a new provincial leadership was installed in Zhejiang. Apart from expunging the influence of their predecessors the new arrivals implemented a program of economic restoration under the direction of Beijing. They also brought back to office prominent former leaders of the pre-Cultural Revolution party committee who had languished in political limbo for the previous five years. Leading members of United Headquarters came under pressure for their past associations with the discredited military leadership. Red Storm, by contrast, had relied greatly on its contacts the old provincial civilian and military leaders and with Xu Shiyou in Nanjing. With the return of overthrown cadres in increasing numbers and Xu's prominent role in purging the influence of Lin Biao in Zhejiang, Red Storm's stocks were set to rise.

However, beginning in 1973, disagreements over the pace and extent of the reforms which had been put in place across China threatened the unity of the central leadership. Mao had been badly shaken by Lin's defection and had allowed Zhou Enlai to introduce policies designed to stimulate the economy and strengthen social and political order. However, he was not prepared to countenance complete rejection of the ideals and political style of the Cultural Revolution. Therefore, in 1973-74 he permitted and encouraged radical central leaders to test anew the commitment of their social base to the objectives and methods of the Cultural Revolution. By so doing the Chairman triggered off a struggle to defend or move away from the politics and policies of the Cultural Revolution. In essence, it was a fight between its political beneficiaries on the one hand and its losers and sufferers on the other.

The renewed radical thrust witnessed the reemergence of mass organization leaders who had made their first appearance in the political arena in the turmoil of the mid-1960s. Many activists of the Cultural Revolution had been admitted into the CCP in the intervening years but their career prospects were blocked and threatened by the increasing number of older cadres who returned to their posts after 1972. The desire to uphold and continue the policies and goals of the Cultural

-108-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rebellion and Factionalism in a Chinese Province: Zhejiang, 1966-1976
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 340

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.