The Fall of Constantinople: Being the Story of the Fourth Crusade

By Edwin Pears | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER XVII.
CONCLUSION.

IT remains to be told how the tidings of the conquest of Constantinople and the overthrow of the Eastern Empire was received by Innocent. The deviation at Zara and again at Corfu for the imperial city had been in direct opposition to the Pope's instructions. His absolution for the crime at Zara had been conditional upon no further attack being made upon the territory of any Christian nation. If the condition were not observed the absolution became ipso facto null. The Crusaders had been anxious that their first offence should be absolved by Innocent, but the leaders, doubtless, did their best to keep him in ignorance of the object of the expedition until it had been accomplished. The absolution had been conveyed to Corfu by Nivelon de Quierzy towards the end of April. The means of conveyance, however, were then so slow that the Pope only learned of what passed when it was too late to interfere with success. On the 20th of June, Innocent wrote to Boniface under the impression that the expedition, which had left nearly a month before, was still on that island.1 Nearly two months later he appears to have been in doubt whether the fleet had really left for Constantinople.2 It was not apparently until January 1204 that Innocent learned what was the destination of the crusade, although at that time the city had been captured and young Alexis restored.3

How the news was received by Innocent.

____________________
1
Inno. III. Epist., vi. 102.
2
Inno. III., vii. 130. 'Exercitus crucesignatorum in Græciam dicitur divertisse.'
3
VI. 209. Within the recollection of men still living it was not unusual for ships to have to wait two months before being able to pass through the Dardanelles.

-378-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Fall of Constantinople: Being the Story of the Fourth Crusade
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 418

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?