The Universe of Creatures

By William Of Auvergne; Roland J. Teske | Go to book overview

and to the extent that it was possible for it to be like him, four things necessarily proceeded from it through its act of understanding and through its intellect. For, in understanding the first creator in his magnificence and glory, as though irradiated and filled with great light, it emitted, like a brightness, a second intelligence from itself. But in understanding its own potentiality, it cast from itself, like a shadow, the matter of the first heaven. But in understanding itself in its perfection, it emitted from itself a second brightness, and there proceeded from it, like a ray of a lesser and second light, the form of the first heaven, and in that way the first heaven is completed through its intellect and its act of understanding. And they wanted to understand this form of heaven as the bodily form of the same. Fourthly, in understanding its spiritual being, by which this intelligence is an intelligence, it shed from itself a third ray, that is, the soul of the first heaven which is a power that moves it only in place. And they understood this to be the form and perfection in the proper sense of the heaven.47 They, of course, maintained that the heaven was an animal composed of the body moved, as its matter, and of such a soul that moves it in this way, as its form. And in this way they said that the lower intelligences, the matters of the lower heavens, and their bodily forms and souls proceeded from higher intelligences until they came to the tenth intelligence which they maintained was the intelligible sun of our souls. They maintained that from it there begins the production of many and multiple things and that nothing more noble than our souls can come from them (619b), as if their light were dimmed to that point and their power diminished through being distanced from the first and universal font.


Chapter Twenty-Six
The destruction of the previous error of Aristotle and of others.

With these points set forth, then, in accord with the opinion of those people, I shall begin to examine whether the truth is that way. For those who make this claim seem to detract much from the glory and magnificence of the creator and to attribute more than is fitting of might and power to the previously mentioned substances. First of all, then, they seem to have erred about the tenth intelligence which they call the agent intelligence. For either it is

____________________
47
See Avicenna, Metaphysics IX, 4: Van Reit, p. 483, where Avicenna says, "But under each intelligence there is a heaven along with its matter and its form, which is a soul, and the intelligence below it. Beneath every intelligence, then, there are three things in being; hence, it is necessary that the possibility of there being these three come from that first intelligence in creation on account of the trinity which is mentioned in it, and what is noble follows from the more noble in many ways. Therefore, from the first intelligence insofar as it understands the first there follows the being of another intelligence inferior to it, and insofar as it understands itself, there follows from it the form of the ultimate heaven and its perfection, and this is a soul. . . ." Though Avicenna mentions only three things which follow upon the first intelligence, William counts four.

-84-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Universe of Creatures
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 240

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.