CHAPTER XXVIII
THE PENTARCHY AND THE NEW ARMED FORCES

WHEN A GOVERNMENT was being formed at the Officers' Club of the camp, we ran into difficulties. Prof. Carlos de la Torre, whom we wanted to head the provisional regime, could not accept the offer for reasons of family and health. In his place, Dr. Ramón Grau San Martín, a physician and university professor, was designated.

Political and military leaders who had distinguished themselves in the struggle against Gen. Machado's Government were potential candidates for the nation's highest office. These included Gen. Mario García Menocal, ex-President of the Republic and a veteran of the War of Independence, and Colonel of the Army of Liberation Carlos Mendieta Montefur. To keep the triumphant revolution from appearing partisan, I, as the chief of the revolutionary movement, recommended that as neutral a figure as possible be selected. At dawn, it was decided to form a pentarchy. I refused to take part in this when offered the post of Minister of War. I told them that I preferred to remain in the Armed Forces and reorganize them, since all the officers of the Army, Navy, and the Police had been turned out. I became Chief of the Army and recommended a technical expert from the Naval Corps as Chief of the Navy.

The Government of the Pentarchy consisted of journalist Sergio Carbó, economist Porfirio Franca, professor and lawyer Guillermo Portela, financial expert José M. Irizarri, and Grau San Martin. The latter became Provisional President six days after the Presidential form of government was adopted for, as

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