Globe and Hemisphere: Latin America's Place in the Postwar Foreign Relations of the United States

By J. Fred Rippy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
CULTURAL RELATIONS, HEMISPHERIC AND GLOBAL: "THE VOICE OF AMERICA"

"The [people of the] United States [must] realize the ever increasing need of bringing together the two basic streams of Western civilization which have given the New World such a commanding place in the struggle for freedom and human betterment. The Latin Americans [must] also realize it. But neither [people] is...quite sure that the other does. It is a most worthy task to correct this misapprehension."

THESE are the words of Luis Muñoz Marín, chief executive of the new "Commonwealth" of Puerto Rico, who is an ardent friend of both Americas and eager to prevent any misunderstanding from hampering their cordial co-operation.1 The primary purpose of cultural relations is to harmonize interests and ideals.

There are differences in the customs, patterns of value, and economic conditions of the two peoples of America and dissimilarities in these respects between the various Latin nations: themselves. This, Mufioz Marín would be the first to admit. But he believes that no fundamental disagreement exists with reference to their major objectives of peace, security, progress, democracy, and personal liberty -- only disagreement regarding the methods of attaining them and on points of emphasis, and doubts regarding the measure of devotion of each of the two major groups to their common ideals.

Like many others in similar circumstances, the Latins of America are said to be in the grip of a "revolution of expectations."

-189-

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