The Other Europe: Eastern Europe to 1945

By E. Garrison Walters | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Notes

Chapter 1--The Lands of Eastern Europe
1.
A good summary of the regionalization of Eastern Europe is provided in George W. Hoffman , "Regional Synthesis: An Introduction," in George W. Hoffman, ed., Eastern Europe: Essays in Geographical Problems ( New York: Praeger Publishers, 1970), pp. 1- 31.

Chapter 2--History to 1800
1.
Francis Dvornik, The Slavs: Their Early History and Civilization ( Boston: American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1956), pp. 13-14.
2.
This interpretation of Ottoman rule in the Balkans is controversial; many, especially Greeks, Bulgarians, Serbs, and Macedonians, have a harsher view. For an excellent analysis of the structure and operation of the Ottoman state in Southeast Europe see Peter F. Sugar , Southeastern Europe under Ottoman Rule, 1354-1804 ( Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1977), pp. 31-59.
3.
For a summary of the reasons for the decline of the Ottoman economy, see John R. Lampe and Marvin R. Jackson, Balkan Economic History, 1550-1950 ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1982), pp. 21-49.

Chapter 3--History, 1800-1848
1.
For an excellent discussion of both the influence of France and the role of the Polish emigres, see John C. Campbell, French Influence and the Rise of Roumanian Nationalism ( New York: Arno Press & the New York Times, 1971).
2.
Norman Davies remarks that the Poles "belong to a community which has acquired its modern sense of nationality in active opposition to the policies of the states in which they lived." God's Playground: A History of Poland ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1984), 2, p. 11.
3.
The Habsburg Emperor Joseph Il attempted to Germanize the Jews as a part of his overall effort at centralization; this effort met with considerable success, with some effect even in the Polish areas where the Jews had lived quite apart from the rest of society.

-393-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Other Europe: Eastern Europe to 1945
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 432

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?