Modularity and Constraints in Language and Cognition

By Megan R. Gunnar; Michael Maratsos | Go to book overview

Subject Index

A
Abduction: abstract concept formation, 197-200,206
differences in male and female, 200
hypothesis competition, 197, 202
hypothesis refinement, 197, 202
in grammar acquisition, 197
spatial learning, 201-205
configurational knowledge, 202
episodic knowledge, 202
gender differences, 201-205
in rats, gender differences, 204-205
use of mental maps, 201
Affect theory, 141-143
affiliation, 144
biases in, 143
communicative interchange, affective
analysis of, 144
density of affective communication, 147
emotional expression, frequency and type 146(t), 148(t)
language and affect, 142
language and emotion, 142
primary emotions, according to
Tomkins, 144
sequential patterns in, 149-150(t)

B
Beliefs, intuitive biological, in children, 106-107, 185-186
Biological bases of language development, 28-30, 54-55
Biological constraints, 59, 60
Biological thought
acquisition of, 104
children's beliefs and disease agents, 123-125(f), 126
children's beliefs and patterns of biological contagion, 119-121(f), 122(f)
children's intuitive beliefs, 106-107
developmental changes in, 112-119
domain specificity, 131-132
emergence of, 135
teleology and, 127-131

C
Cerebral hemispheres, processing differences in, 190-197
asymmetry in animals, 193
familial-handedness and variations of linguistic knowledge, 194-197
left hemisphere and language, 190
local lexical processing vs. global syntactic processing, 207
relational vs. unary processing, 192-194
Chomsky's model of linguistic structure, 12-15
modules in, 12(f)
transformational grammar in, 13(f) limitations of, 140
see also: Fodor's model of cognitive structure, 15-19
Co-orientation, linguistic and affective, 159
Cognitive structure, Fodor's model of, 15-19
Computations, mental life as
and linguistics, 180
in modularity hypothesis, 180
input-output systems, 180

-239-

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Modularity and Constraints in Language and Cognition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Constraints, Modules, and Domain Specificity: An Introduction 1
  • References 23
  • 2 - Modularity and Constraints in Early Lexical Acquisition: Evidence from Children's Early Language and Gesture 25
  • References 55
  • 3 - Constraints on Word Learning: Speculations About Their Nature, Origins, and Domain Specificity 59
  • Acknowledgments 95
  • References 96
  • 4 - The Origins of an Autonomous Biology 103
  • Acknowledgments 135
  • Acknowledgments 135
  • 5 - Language, Affect, and Social Order 139
  • Appendix 172
  • Acknowledgments 176
  • References 176
  • 6 - The Logical and Extrinsic Sources of Modularity 179
  • References 209
  • 7 - Beyond Modules 213
  • 8 - What Do Developmental Psychologists Really Want? 221
  • References 231
  • Author Index 233
  • Subject Index 239
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