The Origin and Development of Scholarly Historical Periodicals

By Margaret F. Stieg | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abraham Lincoln Quarterly, 113
Academy of Sciences ( U.S.S.R.), Division of Historical Sciences, 174
Academy of Sciences ( U.S.S.R.), Institute of History, 174
Acheson, Dean, 147
Acton, Sir John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Baron, 42, 47, 71; "The Massacre of St. Bartholomew," 43
Adams, George Burton, 44, 47, 73, 75, 84, 88
Adams, Herbert Baxter, 44
Administration, 191
Administrative problems: Catholic Historical Review, 118; Zeitschrift für Sozialund Wirtschaftsgeschichte, 117
Advertising, 191
Advisory board: Victorian Studies, 141
African Economic History Review, 83, 84, 109, 116
African Historical Studies, 83-84
African history, 83-84
Albania, 81
Alexander Kohut Memorial Foundation, 120
All-Union Society of Former Political Prisoners and Exiles, 169
Allgemeine Zeitschrift für Geschichte, 23
Allison, Francis, 120
Alvord, Clarence, 74-75, 84-100 passim; editorial style, 96
Amateur interest, 105, 122; Catholic Historical Review, 114-15
Ambix: The Journal of the Society for the Study of Alchemy and Early Chemistry, 103
America: History and Life, 186
American Catholic Historical Association, 118
American historians: lack of theoretical interest, 45; perception of role of historical scholarship, 46; periodicals in which could publish before AHR, 44
American Historical Association, 44, 48, 51, 70, 179; controversy over relationship to AHR, 73-76, 99
American Historical Review, 7, 83, 84, 89, 93, 108, 112, 114, 116, 123, 158, 182, 191, 195, 226 (n. 11), audience, 63-64; availability of articles, 55; book reviews, 58-60; circulation, 77-78; contribution to scholarly communication, 81; contributors, 50-51; controversy over relationship with AHA, 99; criteria for acceptance of articles, 56-57; decreasing percentage of articles available published, 55; documents section, 61-62; editor's role, 55; editorial board, 72-73; editorial board, resentment toward, 73-76; editorial policy, 51-53; establishment, 7, 40-46; finances, 76-80, 77; founders, 47-48, 73; frequency of publication, 63; impact on profession, 80-81; importance of acceptance of articles in, 58; interest in European history, 49; leading American scholarly historical periodical, 70; legal ownership of, 78; news section, 61-62; payment of contributors, 79-80; physical size, 63; political bias, 152-54; political orientation, 66; political purpose, 40; prestige, 58; price, 121; purpose, 7, 40; reaction by historians, 80-81; referees, 56; relationship to American Historical Association, 73; relationship to Indiana University, 79; role, 63, 80-81; scholarly orientation, 66; scope of articles, 49
American Journal of Ancient History, 104
American Journal of Sociology, 44
American Literature, 131
Amistad, 128
Andover Review, 44
Andrews, Charles M., 110, 215 (n. 24)
Anglo-American historians: political bias, 151-52
Annales, 66-70, 125-26, 147-48, 191, 195

-249-

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