Uncommon Common Women: Ordinary Lives of the West

By Anne M. Butler; Ona Siporin | Go to book overview

Introduction

We never expected to spend so much time with these uncommon common women. They came into our lives, near Bismarck, North Dakota, as a presentation for the Girl Scouts of America. That occasion, in 1991, introduced us to the concept of melding history with storytelling to fashion a performance about the lives of western women. We were as delighted by the experience of working together as we were by the warm reception we received from the Girl Scouts, though treading into the area of joint performance marked uncharted waters.

After our trip to North Dakota, flushed with the fun of our shared efforts, we decided to build on our ideas about the ordinary women who deserve attention for their western experience. We took our original presentation and added, deleted, reshaped, rethought. Within a short time, we found we had a performance that shifted and changed as we worked with it and as we became closer friends. Thus came into being the program we called Uncommon Common Women.

With an endorsement from the Utah Humanities Council and the power of word of mouth, Uncommon Common Women started to circulate through the Beehive State. We received invitations from women's groups, church organizations, historical societies, civic agencies, and individuals. We visited small towns, universities, and national and state forest campgrounds. In all of these places, audiences overwhelmed us with their enthusiastic response to this marriage of two mediums. Most especially, women, young and old, spoke about how Uncommon Common Women touched their memories and their hearts.

The joy of companionship, the intellectual pleasure of the performances, the warm reactions of listeners--these alone sustained us. Yet, time and again, people asked about our plans to publish a book. We deflected these inquiries with a laugh. It was enough to have bonded two such different styles.

We had not counted on the persuasive powers of Michael Spooner, director of the Utah State University Press. Through his vision, we came to see the potential for this book. He developed the practical approach to Uncommon Common Women as a literary presentation. We acknowledge our intellectual debt to him and thank him for adding another dimension to our work.

Nonetheless, each of us brought some fears to this project, because in it we have stepped aside from our usual categories of professional expertise. We worried about

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Uncommon Common Women: Ordinary Lives of the West
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Women of the Prairies 5
  • 2 - Immigrant Women 35
  • 3 - Indigenous Women 53
  • 4 - Women of the Schoolhouse 67
  • 5 - Women of the Criminal World 89
  • 6 - Women of the Fort and the City 105
  • 7 - Work, Grief, and Joy 111
  • Suggested Readings 127
  • Photo Credits 133
  • About the Authors 138
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 142

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.