Riveting and Rationing in Dixie: Alabama Women and the Second World War

By Mary Martha Thomas | Go to book overview

Introduction

World War II profoundly changed the old order of American society and economy and presented women with opportunities for new and expanded roles in the life of the nation. As the selective service drafted men into the armed forces, a tremendous labor shortage developed, both in the rapidly expanding defense industries and in the private sector. The government then turned to "womanpower" and encouraged women to take paid wartime jobs, enlist in the military, become nurses, or perform volunteer work. Thousands of Alabama women responded by taking jobs in the airplane plants, the shipyards, and the munition depots of the state. A few women contributed to the war effort by joining the newly created WACS or WAVES. Other women volunteered their services to roll bandages, spot airplanes, issue ration books, or act as nurses' aides. Instead of the usual wife, mother, and homemaker role, Alabama women were asked to undertake a wide variety of unusual tasks. The most important change for women was their employment in jobs normally occupied by men, positions that paid higher wages than those in traditionally female fields and were thought to require "masculine" abilities and attitudes. The ability of women to step into men's shoes and wear them rather comfortably posed an implicit challenge to traditional notions about femininity and female limitations. The war, then, had the potential of drastically changing society and the posi

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Riveting and Rationing in Dixie: Alabama Women and the Second World War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 Home Fronts: the Nation and Alabama 4
  • Chapter 2 the Recruitment and Training of Women 21
  • Chapter 3 Women as Defense Workers 36
  • Chapter 4 Adjusting to Women Workers 63
  • Chapter 5 Women and Volunteer Activities 81
  • Chapter 6 Housewives During Wartime 99
  • Conclusion 112
  • Notes 122
  • Essay On 137
  • Index 141
  • About the Author 146
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 150

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.