together to see our pretty miss, so much more strong for my "spell" which I have work. Ho! ho!'

He seemed so confident that I, remembering my own confidence two nights before and with the baneful result, felt awe and vague terror. It must have been my weakness that made me hesitate to tell it to my friend, but I felt it all the more, like unshed tears.


CHAPTER XI

LUCY WESTENRA'S DIARY

12 September. -- How good they all are to me! I quite love that dear Dr Van Helsing. I wonder why he was to anxious about these flowers. He positively frightened me, he was so fierce. And yet he must have been right, for I feel comfort from them. already. Somehow, I do not dread being alone to-night, and I can go to deep without fear. I shall not mind any flapping outside the window. Oh, the terrible struggle that I have had against sleep so often of late; the pain of the sleeplessness, or the pain of the fear of sleep, with such unknown horrors as it has for me! How blessed are some people, whose lives have no fears, no dreads; to whom sleep is a blessing that comes nightly, and brings nothing but sweet dreams. Well, here I am to-night, hoping for sleep, and lying like Ophelia in the play, with 'virgin crants and maiden strewments.'* I never liked garlic before but to-night it is delightful! There is peace in its smell; I feel sleep coming already. Good-night everybody.


DR SEWARD'S DIARY

13 September. -- Called at the Berkeley and found Van Helsing, as usual, up to time. The carriage ordered from the hotel was waiting. The professor took his bag, which he always brings with him now.

Let all be put down exactly. Van Helsing and I arrived at

-132-

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