Quincey are looking after horses. Godalming think that it will be well to have horses always in readiness, for when we get the information which we seek there will be no time to lose. We must sterilise all the imported earth between sunrise and sunset; we shall thus catch the Count at his weakest, and without a refuge to fly to. Van Helsing is off to the British Museum, looking up some authorities on ancient medicine. The old physicians took account of things which their followers do not accept, and the Professor is searching for witch and demon cures which may be useful later.

I sometimes think we must be all mad and that we shall wake to sanity in strait-waistcoats.

Later . -- We have met again. We seem at last to be on the track, and our work of to-morrow may be the beginning of the end. I wonder if Renfield's quiet his anything to do with this. His moods have so followed the doings of the Count, that the coming destruction of the monster may be carried to him in some subtle way. If we could only get some hint as to what passed in his mind between the time of my argument with him yesterday and his resumption of fly-catching, it might afford us a valuable clue. He is now seemingly quiet for a spell. . . . Is he? -- that wild yell seemed to come from his room. . . .

The attendant came bursting into my room and told me that Renfield had somehow met with some accident. He had heard him yell; and when he went to him found him lying on his face on the floor, all covered with blood. I must go at once. . . .


CHAPTER XXI
DR SEWARD'S DIARY

3 October. -- Let me put down with exactness all that happened, as well as I can remember it, since last I made and entry. Not a detail that I can recall must be forgotten; in all calmness I must proceed.

When I came to Renfield's room I found hi lying on the floor on his left side in a glittering pool of blood. When I went to move him, it became at once apparent that he had recieved

-274-

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