friend Arthur would say when he put on his red frock! Our old fox is wily; oh; so wily, and we must follow with wile. I too am wily and I think his mind in a little while. In meantime we may rest and in peace, for there are waters between us which he do not want to pass, and which he could not if he would -- unless the ship were to touch the land, and then only at full or slack tide. See, and the sun is just rose, and all day to sunset is to us. Let us take bath, and dress, and have breakfast which we all need, and which we can eat comfortable since he be not in the same land with us.' Mina looked at him appealingly as she asked:--

'But why need we seek him further, when he is gone away from us?' He took her hand and patted it as he replied:--

'Ask me nothing as yet. When we have breakfast, then I answer all questions.' He would say no more, and we separated to dress.

After breakfast Mina repeated her question. He looked at her gravely for a minute and then said sorrowfully:--

'Because, my dear, dear Madam Mina, now more than ever must we find him even if we have to follow him to the jaws of Hell?' She grew paler as she asked faintly:--

'Why?'

'Because,' he answered solemnly, 'he can five for centuries, and you are but mortal woman. Time is now to be dreaded -- since once he put that mark upon your throat.'

I was just in time to catch her as she fell forward in a faint.


CHAPTER XXIV
DR SEWARD'S PHONOGRAPH DIARY, SPOKEN BY VAN HELSING

This to Jonathan Harker.

You are to stay with your dear Madam Mina. We shall go to make our search -- if I can call it so, for it is not search but knowing, and we seek confirmation only. But do you stay and take care of her to-day. This is your best and most holiest office. This day nothing can find him here. Let me tell you that

-314-

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