Chapter 13
The Constitution of India

THE circumstances of constitution-making in India were different from those in which the other great federations of the world have been fashioned and a brief reference to the differences may be profitable. When the U.S.A. came into existence, a number of independent States, previously unconnected with one another except through their common subordination to the British Crown and subsequent rebellion against it, accepted the necessity of federation somewhat grudgingly to meet particular dangers and difficulties. They were therefore determined to limit the authority of the Federal Centre and insisted on retaining for themselves all powers not specifically transferred to the Union. In Canada, on the other hand, a federation was adopted for generally accepted reasons of convenience, after a somewhat unsatisfactory period of unitary government and since the Canadian Federation, according to Berriedale Keith, 'grew up under the shadow of the great conflict between North and South in America' the makers of the constitution were determined not to repeat the American error of leaving the powers of the States undefined. They decided in favour of a strong Central Government with which the residuary powers should rest. In the case of Australia, the Colonies had been autonomous, the Federation was a convenience rather than a necessity and the Federal Government was only given those powers deliberately surrendered by the States.

None of these three patterns obtained in India in 1947. From August 15 the Constituent Assembly was a fully sovereign body, competent to frame either a unitary or a federal constitution without consultation with any outside authority. There were, of course, provincial rivalries and loyalties, but in the first flush of newly gained freedom they counted for little against the universal pride of independence. The leaders of the Congress Party were the unquestioned

-120-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modern India
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 270

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.