Rexford Tugwell and the New Deal

By Bernard Sternsher | Go to book overview

16. Tugwell versus Peek and the Purge in the AAA: 1933-1935

I

Now we can see that a battle in the AAA was virtually inevitable. In early 1933 Tugwell did not see this clearly. An April entry in his diary indicates that he favored Peek for the post of AA Administrator. He preferred a "hard-boiled Progressive," but Peek would bring the Baruch faction's support and the processors' co-operation. Thus progress would be slower, but surer. Peek's other assets were his grasp of the possibilities in the marketing-agreement section of the AA Act, his administrative ability, badly needed for an untried program, and, above all, his loyalty to the cause of agriculture.1

On the other hand, Tugwell had some misgivings about Peek, a conservative in philosophy who "may oppose production controls and urge too much on marketing agreements and dumping abroad." Older and wealthier than Wallace and Tugwell, Peek had powerful friends. There was the possibility that he "may run off with the show." Still, despite his doubts, Tugwell was somewhat naïve. Twenty years later he added to his diary the comment that he "should have been certain Peek's appointment would not work." In the struggle for power in Washington, "ruthless to a degree unbelievable to the outsider," Tugwell was "not yet tough enough." He believed the best in people, ignoring jealousies and intrigues. But, he noted, "I learned."2

There were two main differences between Peek's and Tugwell's ideas on a farm program. Peek wanted to concentrate on marketing agreements as the means to the recovery of agriculture; Tugwell stressed control of production--as an emergency measure (he remarked in his diary that crop restriction was negative and temporary compared to land utilization, necessarily the core of a long-range plan3 ). Each saw usefulness under certain circumstances in the other's preferred device. The dispute between them was over relative emphasis.

So long as the AAA used both devices, in whatever ratio, marketing agreements themselves were a second source of differences. In Peek's view, the purpose of marketing agreements was domestic disposal of farm products at higher prices for farmers. In Tugwell's view, higher prices would not necessarily be parity prices. Relying on acreage restriction to assure disposal, he contemplated a broader function for marketing agreements. He maintained that they should take into account retail prices as well as the prices farmers received.

-194-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rexford Tugwell and the New Deal
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 540

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.