U. S. One, Maine to Florida

By Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

RHODE ISLAND

Mass. Line -- Pawtucket -- Providence -- Narragansett -- Conn. Line, 60 m. US 1.

New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R. parallels this route.

Paved highway, some of it four-lane.

Accommodations of all kinds in Providence; limited accommodations elsewhere.


Section 7. Massachusetts Line to Connecticut Line, 60 m.

The northern section of this route goes through the industrial and commercial area of the State, through Providence, the capital city, and its thickly populated environs of Pawtucket and Cranston. South of the latter city the route passes through a less densely settled section of the State, through the coastal townships of Warwick, East Greenwich, Narragansett, and the Kingstowns, which are rich in historic interest. The road in many places affords pleasant views of a prosperous farming country, and of the waters of Narragansett Bay and the Atlantic Ocean.

South of the Massachusetts Line US 1 runs for about three miles through the eastern section of Pawtucket.

PAWTUCKET, 1.5 m. (25 alt., 77,149 pop.), industrial city

(see R.I. GUIDE).

points of Interest. Old Slater Mill, Old Pidge Tavern, Daggett House Museum, St. Mary's Church of the Immaculate Conception, New City Hall, Narragansett Park, and others.

US 1 bypasses many of the historic sites of this old city to run on Broadway past small stores and tenements.

At 1.7 m. is the Division St. Bridge over the Pawtucket River, which once provided water power for the Slater cotton mill and other early textile factories. At the W. end of the bridge, the road turns (L) on Pawtucket Ave., on which is the PIDGE TAVERN, 3.1 m. (L), said to be the oldest house in Rhode Island; the right end of this substantial two-and-a-half-story building faces the street.

At 3.2 m. is the Pawtucket-Providence boundary line.

PROVIDENCE, 5.7 m. (12 alt., 252,981 pop.), State capital (see R.I. GUIDE).

Points of Interest. Brown University, State House, Roger Williams Park, Rhode Island Historical Society, Rhode Island School of Design (arts and crafts), and numerous historic houses.

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U. S. One, Maine to Florida
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Notes on Use of Book ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Special Foods from Maine to Florida xvii
  • Maine xix
  • Maine 1
  • New Hampshire 47
  • Massachusetts 55
  • Rhode Island 65
  • Connecticut 89
  • New York 114
  • New Jersey 124
  • Pennsylvania 135
  • Maryland 151
  • District of Columbia 184
  • Virginia 185
  • North Carolina 210
  • South Carolina 231
  • Georgia 240
  • Florida 252
  • Side Route 1 296
  • Annual Events Along Us 1 311
  • Index 323
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 344

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.