U. S. One, Maine to Florida

By Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview
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NEW YORK

Conn. Line -- Port Chester -- New Rochelle -- New York -- N.J. Line, 22.2 m. US 1.

New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R. and New York, Westchester & Boston R.R. parallel this route. Four-lane concrete roadbed except for macadam stretches through business centers. Complex network of roads in Westchester County makes it necessary to follow directions carefully. Accommodations limited because of proximity to New York City.


Section 10. Connecticut Line to New Jersey Line, 22.2 m.

This section of the through route, known as the Boston Post Road, follows the shore of Long Island Sound across Westchester County, a county of suburban homes, large estates, and wealthy clubs, of natural beauty in proximity to carefully landscaped parkways.

At the Connecticut-New York Line US 1 crosses the Byram River, which runs along the northwestern border of PORT CHESTER, 0 m. (34 alt., 22,622 pop.), first known as Saw Pit, which was settled about 1650. The Byram River, now the State Line, in Colonial days flowed through the center of the village. Unlike other communities on the route, Port Chester is partly dependent on its manufacturing plants. The principal products are candy, ammonia, nuts and bolts, furnaces, coal and gas ranges, soft drinks, and commercial cartons.

At 0.5 m. (R) is the five-story PLANT OF LIFE SAVERS, INC. (guide service free), national headquarters of the confectionery firm.

The PORT CHESTER LIBRARY AND MUSEUM, Westchester Ave. and Haseco St., contains a collection of Currier and Ives prints, Japanese and Chinese furniture imported by local sea captains, amusing collection of political campaign buttons of recent years, and several Indian implements found in the vicinity.

The SAMUEL BROWN HOME, Browndale P1., was built in 1660. The house has been altered several times and a wing was added to the original structure 70 years ago; but interior walls, doors, and floors are unchanged. The Dutch oven and the fireplaces have been sealed.

The BROWN GRAVEYARD, Indian Rd., a huddle of fallen tombstones in an overgrowth of brambles and trees, was the private

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