U. S. One, Maine to Florida

By Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

NEW JERSEY

N. Y. Line -- Fort Lee -- Jersey City -- Trenton -- Pa. Line, 68.6 m. us 1.

Erie R.R. parallels the route N. of Jersey City and Pennsylvania R.R. and Baltimore & Ohio R.R. between Jersey City and the Pa. Line. Superhighway of four to six lanes throughout, paved almost entirely with concrete. Accommodations in cities along route.


Section 11. New York Line to Pennsylvania Line, 68.6 m.

US 1 in this State, designed to speed the heavy traffic flow between New York and Philadelphia, avoids most urban congestion and cross traffic. It bypasses the center of every city. Because the road (see illustration) runs for miles without a turn and carries more traffic than any other State highway, many New Jersey residents avoid it. Those who prefer scenery to speed, and historic landmarks to traffic circles, turn off at Elizabeth to State 27, an alternate route to Trenton; but the motorist who likes to test his skill on a modern highway, and is cautious enough to avoid trouble with the State police, should follow US 1. The route is carefully patrolled and traffic regulations are enforced.

From George Washington Bridge, where the New York Line is crossed, US 1 twists through a breath-taking series of underpasses and overpasses until it straightens out for a gradual descent along the western slope of the Palisades on the Bergen Turnpike. Metropolitan residential and industrial development has claimed all of the land here, except for the marshy lowlands of Overpeck Creek. Westward are the clusters of commuters' towns, and in the distance the hazy outline of the Ramapo Mountains. From Jersey City the road sweeps upward to Pulaski Skyway, giving the last panorama of the New York City hinterland, a region of smokestacks and marshes, of a few skyscrapers and many tenements, of patterns in steel rails and confusion in garbage dumps. Between Newark and Linden the industrial area thins out; southward the highway traverses New Jersey countryside, with farms, woodland, nurseries, and only an occasional factory until the outlying part of Trenton is reached. Hills are rare, and there is little in the landscape to divert the driver's attention from the long, straight path of concrete lying ahead.

FORT LEE, 1.1 m. (280 alt., 8,759 pop.), appears chiefly as an

-124-

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U. S. One, Maine to Florida
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Notes on Use of Book ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Special Foods from Maine to Florida xvii
  • Maine xix
  • Maine 1
  • New Hampshire 47
  • Massachusetts 55
  • Rhode Island 65
  • Connecticut 89
  • New York 114
  • New Jersey 124
  • Pennsylvania 135
  • Maryland 151
  • District of Columbia 184
  • Virginia 185
  • North Carolina 210
  • South Carolina 231
  • Georgia 240
  • Florida 252
  • Side Route 1 296
  • Annual Events Along Us 1 311
  • Index 323
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