U. S. One, Maine to Florida

By Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

MARYLAND

Pa. Line -- Rising Sun -- Bel Air -- Baltimore -- Washington, D.C., 89 m. US 1.

Baltimore & Ohio R.R. roughly parallels the route between Baltimore and Washington; Greyhound, Pan-American, and Safeway-Trailways busses follow the route throughout.

Well-paved roadbed throughout; some steep grades and sharp curves; traffic heavy, particularly between Baltimore and Washington. Tourist homes and tourist camps along route; hotels in cities.


Section 13. Pennsylvania Line to Baltimore, 49.8 m.

US 1 is one of two main routes between Philadelphia and Baltimore. The other, US 13-40 (see MD. GUIDE), is less scenic and has heavier truck traffic, though somewhat greater historic interest.

US 1 traverses rolling country, skirting streams in deep valleys, wending along high tablelands, and overlooking fertile and well -- cultivated fields. Dairying is a means of livelihood.

The highway crosses the Maryland Line at the village of SYLMAR, 0 m. (470 alt., 37 pop.).

At 1.9 m. (R) is a marker inscribed NOTTINGHAM LOTS (see Section 12).

RISING SUN, 2.8 m. (387 alt., 565 pop.), is an important banking and trading center for the area, making considerable sales of farm supplies and building materials. A large and well-equipped plant here handles and ships milk.

The community, which is on the brow of a hill, was founded by Henry Reynolds and known as Summer Hill until 1816, when the present name was adopted. This name was taken from that of an old tavern whose sign bore a picture of a sun on the horizon. This old hostelry stood on the spot now occupied by the bank; the present RISING SUN HOTEL, formerly the Maryland House, is on the opposite corner. The original structure on this site was the Odd Fellows' Hall, which was burned, rebuilt on a larger scale, and subsequently turned into a tavern.

In Rising Sun, at 3.4 m., is the junction with a paved road.

Left on this road to the junction with another road at 1.5 m.; R. here and L. at 2.2 m. to WEST NOTTINGHAM ACADEMY, 2.6 m., the oldest surviving Presbyterian educational institution in the New World. At the entrance to the academy

-151-

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U. S. One, Maine to Florida
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Notes on Use of Book ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Special Foods from Maine to Florida xvii
  • Maine xix
  • Maine 1
  • New Hampshire 47
  • Massachusetts 55
  • Rhode Island 65
  • Connecticut 89
  • New York 114
  • New Jersey 124
  • Pennsylvania 135
  • Maryland 151
  • District of Columbia 184
  • Virginia 185
  • North Carolina 210
  • South Carolina 231
  • Georgia 240
  • Florida 252
  • Side Route 1 296
  • Annual Events Along Us 1 311
  • Index 323
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