U. S. One, Maine to Florida

By Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

NORTH CAROLINA

Va. Line -- Henderson -- Raleigh -- Southern Pines -- Rocking­ ham -- S.C. Line, 180 m. US 1.

Seaboard Air Line Ry. parallels route between Norlina and Rockingham; Greyhound Line busses follow route throughout. Paved highway. Hotels in cities and towns; tourist homes, inns, and camps along route.


Section 17. Virginia Line to Raleigh, 66 m.

Between the Virginia Line, 0 m., and Raleigh US 1 runs through rolling farm lands and occasional pine and oak forests; here and there is thick undergrowth from which rise such trees as poplar, ash, gum, juniper, and linden.

Bordering the highway are fields of cotton, corn, and tobacco, cultivated by white and Negro tenant farmers. In spring wild flowers bloom in profusion by the roadside, the white blossoms of dogwood contrasting with the tightly closed lavender-to-purple buds of the Judas-tree, while the ground beneath is carpeted with a tangle of honeysuckle vines. During the autumn goldenrod, asters, and gentians flower against a background of brilliant red and tawny golden leaves. The wintry scene is characterized by leafless boughs against a changing sky, except where evergreens break the monotony of grays and browns.

WISE, 4 m. (389 alt., 265 pop.), named in 1887 for John S. Wise, Governor of Virginia, is a farm village of modest houses, a few stores, and a small hotel, on top of a low hill.

NORLINA, 8 m. (437 alt., 761 pop.), the second largest town in agricultural Warren Co., was for many years a convenient lunching spot for train passengers. Houses are scattered and the town extends into the fields surrounding the center.

Prior to the Civil War this section of northern Warren Co. produced wheat in large quantities, though few cereals other than corn are planted today. The section is a part of the State's "black belt," populated by descendants of slaves numerous in a region of antebellum plantations. Three families living in this neighborhood are said to have owned a thousand Negroes each.

A predominance of Negroes, except in villages, is immediately noticeable. Their tumbling shacks of split logs and pine slabs are

-210-

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U. S. One, Maine to Florida
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Notes on Use of Book ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Special Foods from Maine to Florida xvii
  • Maine xix
  • Maine 1
  • New Hampshire 47
  • Massachusetts 55
  • Rhode Island 65
  • Connecticut 89
  • New York 114
  • New Jersey 124
  • Pennsylvania 135
  • Maryland 151
  • District of Columbia 184
  • Virginia 185
  • North Carolina 210
  • South Carolina 231
  • Georgia 240
  • Florida 252
  • Side Route 1 296
  • Annual Events Along Us 1 311
  • Index 323
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