Labor Markets, Unions, and Government Policies

By Everett Johnson Burtt Jr. | Go to book overview

5
LABOR MOBILITY AND TURNOVER

THE KEY to the structured market is the nature of labor mobility. Do workers readily move from lower-paying to higher-paying jobs? Do they move from jobs requiring lesser skills to more skilled work? Do they move as easily among different industries as among firms in the same industry? Is the worker who frequently changes jobs the experienced or the inexperienced, the well-informed or the one lacking in knowledge of the market; is he the rational man making the careful calculations of net advantage that the economic theorist discusses? In this chapter we shall review some of the empirical studies of such questions and discuss their theoretical implications.


Mobility

One definition of labor mobility for empirical studies is the frequency with which workers change jobs during a particular period of time.1 A broader definition includes all the changes in the worker's position in the labor market. Such a classification would include: interfirm movements, subdivided into occupational, industrial, and geographic changes; movements from employment to unemployment and vice versa; and movements

____________________
1
The Bureau of Census in its 1955 mobility study used this concept, which it called "job mobility," and defined it as "any change of employer during a calendar year, regardless of whether or not is also involved a change in occupation or industry and whether it was voluntary or involuntary." See Robert L. Stein, "Unemployment and Job Mobility," Special Labor Force Reports No. 3, Monthly Labor Review ( April, 1960), vol. 83, p. 350.

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Labor Markets, Unions, and Government Policies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 458

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.