Labor Markets, Unions, and Government Policies

By Everett Johnson Burtt Jr. | Go to book overview

9 ■
THE ORGANIZATION OF THE NATIONAL UNION

AMONG THE VARIOUS institutional organizations of the labor movement, the national (or international) union is the main center of power and authority. As we have seen, the importance of national unions was recognized by Sylvis as early as the 1850's and by Gompers and other leaders in the early days of the old Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions; their effectiveness was demonstrated by the fact that they survived both the early attacks by employers and the mass movement of the Knights of Labor. Especially after the turn of the present century, their strength increased in comparison with the state and local federations of labor, and they dominated both the A.F. of L. and the CIO. Although there have been some attempts to lessen autonomy within the AFL-CIO, if the nationals, especially the larger ones, were unwilling to work together, the merged organization would be powerless.

The national union's source of strength is essentially its control, through either its national officers or its chartered locals, of the bargaining with employers on the terms and conditions of employment. The AFL-CIO bargains with employers only in the case of directly affiliated locals that are chartered by the federation rather than by a national union, and state federations of labor and city centrals cannot act as bargaining agencies. At times several nationals, or their locals, will cooperate in negotiating with a common employer, or with groups of employers, on either a temporary or a permanent basis, through joint councils such as those found in the construction, printing, and hotel industries. But the ultimate authority for participation in such arrangements, for the determination of collective

-161-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Labor Markets, Unions, and Government Policies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 458

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.