The Clandestine Building of Libya's Chemical Weapons Factory: A Study in International Collusion

By Thomas C. Wiegele | Go to book overview

THOMAS C. WIEGELE (1932-1991)

In the midst of working on the copyedited version of this book, Thomas C. Wiegele died unexpectedly. His death was especially untimely in that he had just retired from full-time teaching and was planning to spend more time on his first love, photography, and to do more traveling and writing.

As a former colleague of his at Northern Illinois University, I know that Dr. Wiegele will be remembered fondly by all the people he knew professionally and personally. His record of professional accomplishments is long and distinguished, spanning teaching, research, and administration. He was a professor of political science and a Presidential Research Professor at NIU, a founding member and executive director ( 1981-91) of the Association for Politics and the Life Sciences, and editor ( 1981-91) of the journal Politics and the Life Sciences. He was also one of the first persons in the country to work in the new field of biosocial research. As director of the Program for Biosocial Research at NIU, Dr. Weigele was a leader of innovative research in his tireless quest to bridge the gap between biology and politics.

As the prime mover in establishing a graduate field in biopolitics in the Department of Political Science at Northern Illinois University, Dr. Wiegele had a tremendous impact on many graduate students from various disciplines. His dedication to the graduate program -- through curricular initiatives, internships, and research contributions -- will long be remembered by those colleagues and students whose lives he touched over the last two decades. He leaves them with this legacy: an increased sensitivity to the complexities of the world and the challenge to step beyond the safety and comfort of "conventional wisdom.'

Dr. Wiegele wrote several books, including Biotechnology and International Relations: The Political Dimensions, 1991; Leaders under Stress: A Psychophysiological Analysis of International Crises, 1985 (coauthored with G. Hilton, K. Oots, and S. Kisiel); Biology and the Social Sciences: An Emerging Revolution, 1982; and Biopolitics: Search for a More Human Political Science, 1979. He

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