If I Forget Thee, O Jerusalem: American Jews and the State of Israel

By Robert Silverberg | Go to book overview

FOUR
A Troubled Mandate

THE IMPATIENT, idealistic Americans had their way. Weizmann yielded to the extent of agreeing to let the Zionist representatives at the peace conference ask for all of Palestine as the Jewish national home. He also promised to demand that the ultimate aim of the British mandate would be the creation of a self- governing commonwealth. By the autumn of 1919 these proposals had received Balfour's blessing and were placed before the peace conference.

The first phase of that conference had by then come to an end with the drafting of the Treaty of Versailles, which brought an official close to the war and established the League of Nations. Under Article 22 of the League's covenant--included in the Treaty of Versailles--the former colonial possessions of Germany and Turkey would be allotted by League mandate to various Allied powers; the mandates were to be decreed at a conference to be held at San Remo, Italy, in the spring of 1920. The United States Senate refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles, because it was unwilling to accept the loss of national sovereignty that it deemed was involved in joining the League of Nations; and so there could be no direct American participation in the parceling- out of mandated territories. But the United States insisted that as one of the major powers its consent was necessary for all mandate awards, and this was granted; each award would be submitted for American approval.

This was of great importance to the Zionist cause, for it was still possible that the Jewish homeland would be scuttled. An unofficial

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
If I Forget Thee, O Jerusalem: American Jews and the State of Israel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Six Days in June 1
  • One - The Dream of Herzl 11
  • Two - Zion in the New World 42
  • Three - Toward the Balfour Declaration 69
  • Four - A Troubled Mandate 100
  • Five - Toward the White Paper 133
  • Six - Zionism at War 175
  • Seven - Agitation and Agony 253
  • Eight - The Making of a State 337
  • Nine - Medinat Yisrael 406
  • Ten - The Unending War 497
  • List of Jewish Organizations in the United States 593
  • Acknowledgments 597
  • Bibliography 599
  • Index 605
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 626

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.