Urban Planning in a Multicultural Society

By Michael A. Burayidi | Go to book overview

communities. It could not be otherwise if it is to fulfill its role in strengthening the fabric of the nation's civic culture and pluralist character.


REFERENCES

Banks Vera J. Black Farmers and Their Farms. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Agriculture. Rural Development Research Report No. 59. 1985.

Beaulieu Lionel (ed). The Rural South in Crisis. Boulder: Westview Publisher. 1988.

Bell David. "Anti-Idyll: Rural Horror" in Cloke Paul and Jo Little Contested Countryside Culture: Otherness, Marginalisation, and Rurality. London: Routledge. 1997.

Bellamy Donald L. "Economic and Socio-Demographic Change in Persistent Low-Income Counties", a paper presented at the Annual Meetings of the Southern Rural Sociology Association. New Orleans. 1988.

Benzinger Nancy, Mark Lapping, and Edward Blakely. "Rural Diversity: Challenge for a Century" in Planning and Community Equity. Chicago: The Planner's Press. 1994.

Blevins A. L. "Socio-economic Differences Between Migrants and Non-Migrants", in Rural Sociology, vol. 36, 1971:509-519.

Durant Thomas Jr., and Clark Knowlton. "Rural Ethnic Minorities: Adaptive Response to Inequality", in Ford Thomas (ed), Rural USA: Persistence and Change. Ames: Iowa State University Press. 1978.

Falk William and Thomas A. Lyons. High Tech, Low Tech, No Tech: Recent Industrial and Occupational Change in the South. Albany: State University of New York Press. 1988.

Fitchen Janet. "Why Rural Poverty is Growing Worse: Similar Causes in Diverse Settings", in Castle E. (ed.), The Changing American Countryside. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas. 1995.

Flora C., J. Flora, J. Spears, L. Swanson, with Mark Lapping and Mark Weinberg. Rural America: Legacy and Change. Boulder: Westview Publishers. 1992.

Harrington Michael. The Other America. New York: Penguin. 1971.

Hoppe Robert, et. al. Social and Economic Environments of Black Farmers. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Agriculture. Rural Development Research Report No. 61. 1986.

Howe Jim Ed McMahon, and Luther Propst. Balancing Nature and Commerce in Gateway Communities. Washington, D.C.: Island Press. 1997.

Hyland Stanley and Michael Timberlake. "The Mississippi Delta: Change or Continued Trouble" in Lyson Thomas A. and William Falk (eds), Forgotten Places: Uneven Development in Rural America. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas. 1993.

Kraybill Donald B. and Steven M. Nolt. Amish Entrepreneurs: From Plows to Profits. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 1995.

Kraybill Donald B. and Marc A. Olshan. The Amish Struggle with Modernity. Hanover: University Press of New England. 1994.

Lapping Mark B. "Among the Poorest of the Poor: The Economic Development Imperative for Rural African Americans". Working Paper No. 23, Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University. 1990.

Lapping Mark B. "American Rural Planning, Development Policy, and the Centrality of the Federal State". Rural History, vol. 3, no. 2, 1992:219-42.

Lapping Mark B. "A Tradition of Rural Sustainability: The Amish Portrayed" in Ivonne Audirac (ed.), Rural Sustainability in America. New York: John Wiley and Sons. 1997.

Lemann Nicholas. The Promised Land. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. 1991.

-144-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Urban Planning in a Multicultural Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 264

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.