Scholars and Gentlemen: Shakespearian Textual Criticism and Representations of Scholarly Labour, 1725-1765

By Simon Jarvis | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 2
Collations

The table below is a summary of collations made by line-by-line comparisons of five texts of Hamlet -- Pope 1723-5 text, Theobald's 1733 text, Hanmer's 1744 text, Warburton's 1747 text, and Johnson's 1765 text -- with their respective copy-texts: Rowe's 1714 edition, Pope's 1728 edition, Pope's 1723-5 edition, Theobald's 1733 edition, and Theobald's 1757 edition. Hamlet was chosen as a play with both Quarto and Folio textual traditions. For the full collations themselves see Simon Jarvis, "Scholars and Gentlemen: Shakespearean Textual Criticism and Representations of Scholarly Labour, 1725-1765" ( Ph.D. thesis, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge, 1993), 320-432; space did not permit their inclusion here. In that table variations in stage-directions, lineation, and scenenumbering were not recorded; variations in spelling and punctuation were not recorded except where the sense appeared to be materially affected; clear misprints (such as 'wou' for 'you' on p. 202 of Warburton's text) were not recorded. Only readings actually adopted by editors in their texts are recorded: thus, for example, although Warburton remarks that 'We may be sure, then, that Shakespear wrote, -- the whips and scorns OF TH' TIME', his text continues to read 'the whips and scorns of time' ( 1747, viii. 183) and consequently no variation from Theobald's 1740 text ( viii. 157) was recorded.

The column headed 'source' recorded all previous occurrences (up until 1676) of the reading given in the right-hand column text; it also recorded the first previous eighteenth-century editor (if any) to suggest or print the reading. It should be noted that the appearance of a given copy in the 'source' column only indicated that the same reading had earlier appeared in that copy; in some cases this may represent coincidence rather than indebtedness. Fortuitous coincidences between readings listed and those of the First, 'Bad' Quarto of 1603 were not listed in the 'sources' column: this Quarto was not rediscovered until the early nineteenth century. A text was only listed as providing a 'source' to an eighteenthcentury editor if it gave the same word (variants in spelling have for this purpose been disregarded); it was not possible to record the numerous occasions on which an editor such as Theobald uses the reading of an early text in emended form, and such instances accordingly appeared as 'none'. This indicates the limitations of the list of collations, which is only a necessary, not a sufficient condition of an analysis of editorial practice.

The list of 'sources' was compiled with reference to Furness's Variorum edition. Furness's 'Q2' and 'Q3' are treated as one text by modern editors and are

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