William Beveridge: A Biography

By Jose Harris | Go to book overview

Sources and Select Bibliography

[A NOTE ON SOURCES]

THE most important source for this book is the collection of nearly five hundred boxes of personal papers amassed by Lord Beveridge and deposited in the British Library of Political Science. A collection of such size presented major problems of selection; and many topics covered at length in the primary sources are dealt with only superficially, or not at all. In so far as I pursued a guiding principle in selecting material, it was that Beveridge's chief interest for both the historian and general reader lay in his many and varied contributions to modern social policy. However, history has a habit of up-staging this kind of assumption; and I shall be the first to admit that an entirely different book might have been written by someone who sifted the sources in a different way.

In spite of the wealth of material available, the Beveridge collection proved to be incomplete. Beveridge's own rudimentary card-index to his papers referred to extensive correspondence with the other members of the Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services, who helped to produce the famous Beveridge Report of 1942. On 9 April 1953 Beveridge wrote a long note to Lady Beveridge, advising her on manuscript sources for her book Beveridge and his Plan. In this note he referred to two boxes which contained his correspondence with the Social Insurance Committee, together with other correspondence relating to the Beveridge Report. These letters were not, however, used by Lady Beveridge in writing her book, nor were they found among the Beveridge papers when these were placed in the British Library of Political Science in the 1960s. The correspondence undoubtedly existed, because Beveridge himself listed the individual letters and made extracts from them (see his "Working Notes and Materials" in BP, IXa 37). A few of the missing letters were also referred to in his Autobiography, Power and Influence (pp. 305-8), although it was clearly his intention that the detailed account of the Beveridge Report should be included in his wife's book rather than his own. In spite of extensive inquiries I have been unable to discover what happened to these letters. The loss was not irreparable, as it was possible to make use of Beveridge's manuscript copies and to supplement them with a great deal of further material on the Social Insurance Committee available both among Beveridge's own papers and in the Public Record Office. However, it should be noted that the source material was defective in this important respect.

-499-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Beveridge: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 511

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.