What Sort of Human Nature? Medieval Philosophy and the Systematics of Christology

By Marilyn McCord Adams | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
Shorter versions of this paper were presented at the Pacific Division meeting of the Society of Christian Philosophers at Seattle Pacific University in 1996, and at a conference "The Incarnation: Medieval Perspectives" at Yale University in 1998. I am grateful for audience comments, as for the helpful feedback from my colleague Rowan Greer.
2.
Cf. Peter Lombard fourfold division in Sent. III, d.16,c.2; Sententiae in IV libris distinctae ( Grottaferrata ( Rome): College of St. Bonaventure at Clear Water, 1971), vol. II, p. 105 [hereafter Grottaferrata II. 105]: Boethius offers a three-fold division in Liber contra Eutychen et Nestorium, c. viii, between the state into which Adam was created, the state into which he would have entered had he not fallen, and the state into which he in fact entered upon his fall; and these perhaps reflect Augustine's division into posse peccare/posse non peccare, nonposse non peccare, non posse peccare. Such divisions are present in various degrees of implicimess or explicitness in many patristic writers as well.
3.
Cur Deus homo. II. 11; Opera omnia ad fidem codinum recensuit. Edited by F.S. Schmitt. ( Edinburgh: Thomas Nelson ★ Sons, 1938 1961), vol. II, p. 111, lin.814 [hereafter Schmitt II. 111, 8-14].
4.
Cur Deus honzo II. 11; Schmitt II, 111, 26-112,3.
5.
Cur Deus homo II. 13; Schmitt II. 112, 22-24.
6.
Cur Deus homo II.8; Schmitt II. 103, 7-19.
7.
Cur Deus homo II.8; Schmitt II. 104, 3-11.
8.
Cur Deus homo II.10; Schmitt II. 106, 13-16.
9.
Cur Deus homo II.10; Schmitt II. 107, 6-9.
10.
Cur Deus homo II. 13; Schmitt II. 112, 22-113, 15.
11.
Cur Deus homo II. 1; Schmitt 11-97, 4- 98, 5.
12.
Cur Deus homo II.2, 1011; Schmitt 11.98, 7-11; II. 11; Schmitt II. 109.6-19.

-100-

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  • Title Page 3
  • Prefatory 5
  • What Sort of Human Nature? - Medieval Philosophy and the Systematics of Christology 7
  • Notes 100
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