Hearing Ourselves Think: Cognitive Research in the College Writing Classroom

By Barbara M. Sitko; Ann M. Penrose | Go to book overview

Preface

This project began at Carnegie Mellon University in 1986 with the establishment of the Center for the Study of Writing at UC-Berkeley and at Carnegie Mellon. Sponsored by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (U.S. Department of Education), and recently renewed as The Center for the Study of Writing and Literacy, the Center is a collaborative research initiative that brings together teachers and researchers from the fields of English, rhetoric, linguistics, computer science, psychology, anthropology, and education.

The Center's dual goal has been to foster "research-sensitive practice" and "practice-sensitive research," a goal that can only be achieved through collaborative interaction between teachers and researchers. The contributors to this volume were part of an early dissemination project for the Center, the Research-for-Teaching Seminar Series at Carnegie Mellon, through which they developed and conducted seminars at local and national writing conferences, state teachers meetings, and at individual colleges and universities nationwide. They currently teach at a variety of universities across the country, where they continue to study writing and reading in new institutional settings, with varied student populations, and in the company of faculty colleagues of diverse interests and backgrounds. They have continued to develop and test their ideas and activities in these new contexts, as well as in print and at national conferences.

The topics and concerns of the seminar series reflected Carnegie Mellon's emphasis on cognitive research on reading and writing processes. In developing this collection, we asked former seminar leaders to reflect on this research from their perspective as teachers -- to examine their own courses and describe the principles and practices that govern their teaching. In short, we wanted them to try to articulate the insights gained through their research experiences and to show us how these insights have influenced their writing classrooms. This occasion for reflection and articulation has been an invaluable opportunity for all of us.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hearing Ourselves Think: Cognitive Research in the College Writing Classroom
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.